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Peter DeWan

Peter DeWan

Nonresident Fellow - Global Economy and Development

Peter DeWan is a nonresident fellow with the Global Economy and Development program at Brookings, where he applies network science primarily to analyses of labor markets and industrial development.

Dewan is a quantitative sociologist who pioneered developments in social network analysis, influence, and behavioral change. He applies cutting-edge quantitative social science research to a wide variety of interesting problems with a particular focus on physician networks.

He founded Activate Networks, the first company to model physician influence through administrative data, where he served as chief scientific officer until the company’s acquisition. After its sale, he was vice president of research and development at Decision Resources. Dewan has extensive consulting and teaching experience and is working on a book on quantitative approaches to causal inference, methods for measuring institutional influence in health care, and the spread of innovative health care devices. He holds a B.A. from Columbia and a Ph.D. in sociology from Harvard.

Peter DeWan is a nonresident fellow with the Global Economy and Development program at Brookings, where he applies network science primarily to analyses of labor markets and industrial development.

Dewan is a quantitative sociologist who pioneered developments in social network analysis, influence, and behavioral change. He applies cutting-edge quantitative social science research to a wide variety of interesting problems with a particular focus on physician networks.

He founded Activate Networks, the first company to model physician influence through administrative data, where he served as chief scientific officer until the company’s acquisition. After its sale, he was vice president of research and development at Decision Resources. Dewan has extensive consulting and teaching experience and is working on a book on quantitative approaches to causal inference, methods for measuring institutional influence in health care, and the spread of innovative health care devices. He holds a B.A. from Columbia and a Ph.D. in sociology from Harvard.

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