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Past Event

International economic governance and China’s rise: How should the United States and Japan respond?

Past Event

International economic governance and China's rise: How should the United States and Japan respond?

In recent years, China has emerged as the second largest economy and a trading powerhouse. Its recent attempts to exert greater leadership in international economic governance through the establishment of the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank, participation in the BRICs bank, the launch of the “One Belt, One Road” development strategy, and its leading role in a budding trade grouping in East Asia, the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership, have gathered a lot of attention. What does this flurry of activity tell us about China’s aims and intentions? Is China a revisionist power intent on building an alternative economic order, or is it behaving as a responsible stakeholder, willing to shoulder the burden of providing public goods commensurate to its growing economic stature? What are the implications of China’s new role and initiatives for other leading economies?

On September 30, the Center for East Asia Policy Studies at Brookings and NHK co-hosted a panel of distinguished experts for a discussion on the future of China’s economy, its growing role in international economic governance, and how the United States and Japan should respond to China’s leadership bid.


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Agenda

International economic governance and China's rise: How should the United States and Japan respond?

On September 30, the Center for East Asia Policy Studies at Brookings and NHK co-hosted a panel of distinguished experts for a discussion on the future of China’s economy, its growing role in international economic governance, and how the United States and Japan should respond to China’s leadership bid.

Masahiro Kawai

Representative Director and Director-General - Economic Research Institute for Northeast Asia

Professor, Graduate School of Public Policy - University of Tokyo

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