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An unloaded Twitter website is displayed in front of an Islamic State flag.
An unloaded Twitter website is seen on a phone without an internet connection, in front of a displayed ISIS flag in this photo illustration in Zenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina, February 3, 2016. Iraq is trying to persuade satellite firms to halt Internet services in areas under Islamic State's rule, seeking to deal a major blow to the group's potent propaganda machine which relies heavily on social media to inspire its followers to wage jihad. Picture taken February 3, 2016. To match Insight MIDEAST-CRISIS/IRAQ-INTERNET REUTERS/Dado Ruvic
An unloaded Twitter website is displayed in front of an Islamic State flag in this photo illustration in Zenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina, February 3, 2016. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic

Online violent extremist material represents a major challenge to our digital public sphere, both for the threat it poses to an open internet and in inciting further violence. To combat the presence of such material on their platforms, internet companies banded together to form the Global Internet Forum to Counter Terrorism, and on this week’s episode of Lawfare‘s Arbiters of Truth series on platforms and disinformation, Evelyn Douek and Quinta Jurecic speak with the organization’s executive director, Nicholas Rasmussen. The GIFCT works to facilitate efforts across internet platforms to prevent the spread of terrorist and extremist material, but that work comes with thorny questions: How to best balance free-speech concerns with restrictions on content and how to address the accountability problems associated with its work.