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Tomorrow’s tech policy conversations today

Associate professor of computer science at the University of Southern California Hao Li showcases a 'deepfake' video with Britain's former Prime Minister Theresa May during the 50th World Economic Forum (WEF) annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland, January 22, 2020. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse
Associate professor of computer science at the University of Southern California Hao Li showcases a 'deepfake' video with Britain's former Prime Minister Theresa May during the 50th World Economic Forum (WEF) annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland, January 22, 2020. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse
Associate professor of computer science at the University of Southern California Hao Li showcases a ‘deepfake’ video with Britain’s former Prime Minister Theresa May during the 50th World Economic Forum annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland, January 22, 2020. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse

Hany Farid, a professor in the School of Information at the University of California, Berkeley, speaks with Lawfare’s Quinta Jurecic and Evelyn Douek about deep fakes—realistic AI-generated content in which a person’s likeness is altered to show them doing or saying something they never did or said. They discuss the danger posed by deep fakes, whether the danger stems primarily from the technology itself or the way platforms amplify the content, and what the tech industry response should look like.