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Caitlin Talmadge is associate professor of security studies in the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University, and a nonresident senior fellow in the Foreign Policy program at the Brookings Institution. Her research and teaching focus on deterrence and escalation, nuclear strategy, civil-military relations, defense policy, and U.S. military operations and strategy, particularly in Asia and the Persian Gulf.

Talmadge is author of “The Dictator’s Army: Battlefield Effectiveness in Authoritarian Regimes” (Cornell, 2015), which Foreign Affairs named the “Best Book in Security” for 2016 and which won the 2017 Best Book Award from the International Security Studies Section of the International Studies Association. She also is co-author of “U.S. Defense Politics: the Origins of Security Policy” (third edition 2017, Routledge, with Harvey Sapolsky and Eugene Gholz). Her current book project examines the challenge of crafting conventional military strategies against nuclear-armed opponents, and the implications for potential conflict escalation in eastern Europe and Asia. She has published articles in International Security, Security Studies, The Journal of Conflict Resolution, The Washington Quarterly, The Non-Proliferation Review, The New York Times, and elsewhere.

Talmadge co-leads the Project on Strategic Stability Evaluation, a multi-year, Carnegie-funded effort to understand the effects of emerging technologies on international security. She also currently works on a Minerva grant studying alliances in East Asia. Talmadge’s recent speaking engagements include the U.S. Naval War College, the U.S. Air War College, the National Intelligence Council, the South Korean Army General Staff, the China Institute for International Studies, the Woodrow Wilson Center, the Council on Foreign Relations, the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Georgetown, Yale, Princeton, MIT, and the University of Chicago. She is a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

Talmadge is a graduate of Harvard (A.B., summa cum laude) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Ph.D.). She has held fellowships from Harvard University’s Olin Institute for Strategic Studies, the Smith Richardson Foundation, Brookings Institution, the American Political Science Association, and the Stanton Foundation. Previously, she worked as a research assistant at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, a consultant to the Office of Net Assessment at the U.S. Department of Defense, and a professor at the George Washington University.

Affiliations:
American Political Science Association, member
Council on Foreign Relations, term member
Georgetown University Security Studies Program, core faculty member
Journal of Strategic Studies, editorial board member
International Security Studies Forum, H-Diplo, editorial board member
International Studies Association, member
George Washington University Nuclear Security Working Group, member

Caitlin Talmadge is associate professor of security studies in the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University, and a nonresident senior fellow in the Foreign Policy program at the Brookings Institution. Her research and teaching focus on deterrence and escalation, nuclear strategy, civil-military relations, defense policy, and U.S. military operations and strategy, particularly in Asia and the Persian Gulf.

Talmadge is author of “The Dictator’s Army: Battlefield Effectiveness in Authoritarian Regimes” (Cornell, 2015), which Foreign Affairs named the “Best Book in Security” for 2016 and which won the 2017 Best Book Award from the International Security Studies Section of the International Studies Association. She also is co-author of “U.S. Defense Politics: the Origins of Security Policy” (third edition 2017, Routledge, with Harvey Sapolsky and Eugene Gholz). Her current book project examines the challenge of crafting conventional military strategies against nuclear-armed opponents, and the implications for potential conflict escalation in eastern Europe and Asia. She has published articles in International Security, Security Studies, The Journal of Conflict Resolution, The Washington Quarterly, The Non-Proliferation Review, The New York Times, and elsewhere.

Talmadge co-leads the Project on Strategic Stability Evaluation, a multi-year, Carnegie-funded effort to understand the effects of emerging technologies on international security. She also currently works on a Minerva grant studying alliances in East Asia. Talmadge’s recent speaking engagements include the U.S. Naval War College, the U.S. Air War College, the National Intelligence Council, the South Korean Army General Staff, the China Institute for International Studies, the Woodrow Wilson Center, the Council on Foreign Relations, the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Georgetown, Yale, Princeton, MIT, and the University of Chicago. She is a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

Talmadge is a graduate of Harvard (A.B., summa cum laude) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Ph.D.). She has held fellowships from Harvard University’s Olin Institute for Strategic Studies, the Smith Richardson Foundation, Brookings Institution, the American Political Science Association, and the Stanton Foundation. Previously, she worked as a research assistant at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, a consultant to the Office of Net Assessment at the U.S. Department of Defense, and a professor at the George Washington University.

Affiliations:
American Political Science Association, member
Council on Foreign Relations, term member
Georgetown University Security Studies Program, core faculty member
Journal of Strategic Studies, editorial board member
International Security Studies Forum, H-Diplo, editorial board member
International Studies Association, member
George Washington University Nuclear Security Working Group, member

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