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The federal budget process: Turning reform into political reality

Past Event

Fixing a flawed federal budget process

Overcoming political obstacles in reforming the federal budget process
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Overcoming political obstacles in reforming the federal budget process

The federal budget process has become dysfunctional in recent years, resulting in inefficiencies in resource allocation, unpredictable appropriations for agencies, and is lacking in both transparency and accountability. Convincing lawmakers that it is within their interest to reform the process is perhaps a more challenging endeavor than determining which reforms would be most effective.

On October 18, the National Academy of Public Administration and Economic Studies hosted a discussion of proposals to address the problems with the federal budget process, and how reform might be achieved. Panelists provided insights from their experience and from political science to identify the strategies and scenarios that are most likely to result in successfully reforming the budget process.

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The speakers referred to several publications during the event, including:

Agenda

Breakfast

Welcome

Dan G. Blair

President and CEO - National Academy of Public Administration

Session 1: Fixing a Flawed Federal Budget Process

Moderator

Dan G. Blair

President and CEO - National Academy of Public Administration

F. Stevens Redburn

Professorial Lecturer in Public Policy and Public Administration - George Washington University

Phil Joyce

Senior Associate Dean, Professor of Public Policy - University of Maryland’s School of Public Policy

Session 2: Overcoming Political Obstacles in Reforming the Federal Budget Process

Roy Meyers

Professor of Political Science - University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Closing Remarks

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