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An interactive map shows ship movements around China, seen on a Reuters Eikon screen, October 23, 2015. About 4 million barrels of crude oil bought by a Chinese state trader for the country's strategic reserves have been stranded in two tankers off an eastern port for nearly two months due to a lack of storage, two trade sources said. Picture taken October 23, 2015.  REUTERS/Thomas White - GF20000029024

Global China: Domains of strategic competition

Learn more about Global ChinaWhat are the implications of Chinese activity across various strategic domains — security, infrastructure, economic statecraft, and more — for the United States?

This installment of the Brookings Foreign Policy series “Global China: Assessing China’s Growing Role in the World” helps illuminate China’s expanding global influence in domains of strategic competition.

In the near to medium term, China will likely continue to forgo formal military alliances and full-fledged bases, and instead seek to develop partnerships that allow it access to its expanding interests.

It is neither credible nor wise to promise allies massive U.S. military responses to limited aggression by China or another power. Washington needs a more believable, and feasible, approach.

Given the likelihood of competition, the United States should add sanctions development to its crisis management process, and increase intelligence and analytical capabilities that focus directly on Chinese sanctions doctrine and practice.

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