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Ranj Alaaldin is visiting fellow at the Brookings Doha Center. He was previously a visiting scholar at Columbia University and specialized in intrastate conflict, governance, and human security issues in the Middle East and North Africa region. He currently focuses on post-conflict reconstruction, proxy warfare, security sector reform, and peace-building in conflict. He led election-monitoring and fact-finding teams in Iraq between 2009-2014 as well as Libya during the 2011 uprising. Alaaldin has conducted interviews with political and clerical figures in the Arab and Islamic world, Shiite militias, and ISIS prisoners detained in Iraq. His previous research focused on social movements and sub-national identities, with an emphasis on Iraq’s Shiite community and the religious establishment in Najaf.

Alaaldin has advised government and non-government organizations and was awarded a $400,000 grant by the Carnegie Corporation of New York for a two-year collaborative project on proxy conflict in the MENA region. It includes a Track II initiative that will bring together belligerents to establish de-escalation mechanisms in Iraq, Syria, Libya, and Yemen. He is writing a book on Shiite militias in Iraq and Syria and has published extensively with peer-reviewed journals, the New York Times, Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, Foreign Affairs and Foreign Policy magazine. Alaaldin holds a Ph.D. from the London School of Economics and Political Science.

Ranj Alaaldin is visiting fellow at the Brookings Doha Center. He was previously a visiting scholar at Columbia University and specialized in intrastate conflict, governance, and human security issues in the Middle East and North Africa region. He currently focuses on post-conflict reconstruction, proxy warfare, security sector reform, and peace-building in conflict. He led election-monitoring and fact-finding teams in Iraq between 2009-2014 as well as Libya during the 2011 uprising. Alaaldin has conducted interviews with political and clerical figures in the Arab and Islamic world, Shiite militias, and ISIS prisoners detained in Iraq. His previous research focused on social movements and sub-national identities, with an emphasis on Iraq’s Shiite community and the religious establishment in Najaf.

Alaaldin has advised government and non-government organizations and was awarded a $400,000 grant by the Carnegie Corporation of New York for a two-year collaborative project on proxy conflict in the MENA region. It includes a Track II initiative that will bring together belligerents to establish de-escalation mechanisms in Iraq, Syria, Libya, and Yemen. He is writing a book on Shiite militias in Iraq and Syria and has published extensively with peer-reviewed journals, the New York Times, Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, Foreign Affairs and Foreign Policy magazine. Alaaldin holds a Ph.D. from the London School of Economics and Political Science.

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