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Noha Aboueldahab is a visiting fellow at the Brookings Doha Center. Her research focus is on transitional justice in the Arab region. In particular, she examines the factors that triggered, drove and shaped criminal justice decisions before and after the Arab Spring transitions. Since 2003, she has worked on international law, human rights and development issues at various United Nations agencies and NGOs in New York, Lebanon and Qatar. Her professional work over the years involved field missions and research trips to Argentina, Brazil, Egypt, Israel and the Occupied Palestinian Territories, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Thailand, The Hague, Tunisia, the United Arab Emirates, Uruguay and Yemen.

In her book, Transitional Justice and the Prosecution of Political Leaders in the Arab Region: A comparative study of Egypt, Libya, Tunisia and Yemen (Oxford, Hart Publishing: 2017), she challenges mainstream transitional justice practice and scholarship using original material from interviews she conducted in Egypt, Libya, Tunisia and Yemen between 2012 and 2017.

She has guest lectured courses on law and anthropology at Northwestern University in Qatar and on law and development at Melbourne Law School, served as a judge at Georgetown University in Qatar's first moot court competition, and served as junior faculty at Harvard Law School's Institute for Global Law and Policy. She is a recipient of research and travel grants from University College London, Durham Law School, Harvard Law School, and the Middle East Studies Association. She was also Durham Law School's sole recipient of the Modern Law Review scholarship in 2014/2015.

Noha Aboueldahab is a visiting fellow at the Brookings Doha Center. Her research focus is on transitional justice in the Arab region. In particular, she examines the factors that triggered, drove and shaped criminal justice decisions before and after the Arab Spring transitions. Since 2003, she has worked on international law, human rights and development issues at various United Nations agencies and NGOs in New York, Lebanon and Qatar. Her professional work over the years involved field missions and research trips to Argentina, Brazil, Egypt, Israel and the Occupied Palestinian Territories, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Thailand, The Hague, Tunisia, the United Arab Emirates, Uruguay and Yemen.

In her book, Transitional Justice and the Prosecution of Political Leaders in the Arab Region: A comparative study of Egypt, Libya, Tunisia and Yemen (Oxford, Hart Publishing: 2017), she challenges mainstream transitional justice practice and scholarship using original material from interviews she conducted in Egypt, Libya, Tunisia and Yemen between 2012 and 2017.

She has guest lectured courses on law and anthropology at Northwestern University in Qatar and on law and development at Melbourne Law School, served as a judge at Georgetown University in Qatar’s first moot court competition, and served as junior faculty at Harvard Law School’s Institute for Global Law and Policy. She is a recipient of research and travel grants from University College London, Durham Law School, Harvard Law School, and the Middle East Studies Association. She was also Durham Law School’s sole recipient of the Modern Law Review scholarship in 2014/2015.

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