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marcus casey

Marcus Casey

David M. Rubenstein Fellow - Economic Studies

Marcus Casey is a David M. Rubenstein Fellow in Economic Studies. He is currently on leave from the University of Illinois at Chicago where he is as an Assistant Professor of Economics. Casey’s research interests lie in the areas of urban,  public, and labor economics. His published research examines housing markets, potential housing discrimination, and neighborhood change; educational market dynamics and charter school quality; and academic probation assignment and college student behavior. Casey's ongoing work focuses on how violent crime intensity affects neighborhood choice and the quality of amenities, the implications of growing wealth and income inequality for households and neighborhood as well as how school choice and gentrification interact to affect neighborhood and school outcomes. Casey’s serves as a research consultant with the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago. He is also a member of a research team funded by a grant from the Washington Center for Equitable Growth to study how historical segregation affects contemporary economic outcomes.

Casey was previously a National Science Foundation Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Duke University Department of Economics. He holds a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and a B.A. in Economics from Howard University.

Marcus Casey is a David M. Rubenstein Fellow in Economic Studies. He is currently on leave from the University of Illinois at Chicago where he is as an Assistant Professor of Economics. Casey’s research interests lie in the areas of urban,  public, and labor economics. His published research examines housing markets, potential housing discrimination, and neighborhood change; educational market dynamics and charter school quality; and academic probation assignment and college student behavior. Casey’s ongoing work focuses on how violent crime intensity affects neighborhood choice and the quality of amenities, the implications of growing wealth and income inequality for households and neighborhood as well as how school choice and gentrification interact to affect neighborhood and school outcomes. Casey’s serves as a research consultant with the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago. He is also a member of a research team funded by a grant from the Washington Center for Equitable Growth to study how historical segregation affects contemporary economic outcomes.

Casey was previously a National Science Foundation Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Duke University Department of Economics. He holds a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and a B.A. in Economics from Howard University.

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