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Marcus Casey

David M. Rubenstein Fellow - Economic Studies

Marcus Casey is a David M. Rubenstein Fellow in Economic Studies. Casey is an Assistant Professor of Economics currently on leave from the University of Illinois at Chicago.  He is an applied microeconomist whose research interests lie in urban, labor, and public economics. His work has previously examined the impacts of neighborhood demographic change on housing prices, neighborhood choice, and amenities; housing discrimination; the dynamics of quality in charter school markets; and  evaluating how higher education policies such as academic probation impact vulnerable populations. Casey's ongoing work includes studying the impact of  local violence on neighborhood choice, economic development, and inequality and how neighborhood change affects local education markets. In addition, he is currently member of a team of researchers funded by the Washington Center for Equitable Growth to study the impact of historical segregation on contemporary outcomes such as intergenerational mobility and human capital attainment.

Casey was previously a National Science Foundation Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Duke University Department of Economics. He holds a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and a B.A. in Economics from Howard University.

Marcus Casey is a David M. Rubenstein Fellow in Economic Studies. Casey is an Assistant Professor of Economics currently on leave from the University of Illinois at Chicago.  He is an applied microeconomist whose research interests lie in urban, labor, and public economics. His work has previously examined the impacts of neighborhood demographic change on housing prices, neighborhood choice, and amenities; housing discrimination; the dynamics of quality in charter school markets; and  evaluating how higher education policies such as academic probation impact vulnerable populations. Casey’s ongoing work includes studying the impact of  local violence on neighborhood choice, economic development, and inequality and how neighborhood change affects local education markets. In addition, he is currently member of a team of researchers funded by the Washington Center for Equitable Growth to study the impact of historical segregation on contemporary outcomes such as intergenerational mobility and human capital attainment.

Casey was previously a National Science Foundation Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Duke University Department of Economics. He holds a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and a B.A. in Economics from Howard University.

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