Elizabeth Mann is a Fellow in the Brown Center on Education Policy at Brookings. She studies the politics of education, and in particular, how federal-state relationships shape education policy.
Her research investigates how presidents pursue their policy goals through extra-legislative strategies at the subnational level, focusing on waivers granted from federal laws in K-12 education, welfare, and Medicaid. She finds that presidents approve more waivers when they are ideologically further from Congress, contingent on the share of the nation’s governors in the president’s party. More broadly, this research explores how presidents navigate institutional constraints on their power in the modern era. In other work, Elizabeth studies how aggregate U.S. partisanship changes over time and how attitudes towards women’s role in society have changed.

Elizabeth earned her Ph.D., M.A., and B.A. in political science at the University of Michigan. Previously, she worked at the HighScope Center for Early Education Evaluation and as a middle school social studies teacher through Teach for America.

Elizabeth Mann is a Fellow in the Brown Center on Education Policy at Brookings. She studies the politics of education, and in particular, how federal-state relationships shape education policy.
Her research investigates how presidents pursue their policy goals through extra-legislative strategies at the subnational level, focusing on waivers granted from federal laws in K-12 education, welfare, and Medicaid. She finds that presidents approve more waivers when they are ideologically further from Congress, contingent on the share of the nation’s governors in the president’s party. More broadly, this research explores how presidents navigate institutional constraints on their power in the modern era. In other work, Elizabeth studies how aggregate U.S. partisanship changes over time and how attitudes towards women’s role in society have changed.

Elizabeth earned her Ph.D., M.A., and B.A. in political science at the University of Michigan. Previously, she worked at the HighScope Center for Early Education Evaluation and as a middle school social studies teacher through Teach for America.