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Ali Fathollah-Nejad is visiting fellow at the Brookings Doha Center. In the fall 2018 term, hewas also an adjunct assistant professor in the Ph.D. program of Qatar University’s Gulf Studies Center. Previously, he was a post-doctoral associate with the Harvard Kennedy School’s Iran Project and an associate fellow with the Middle East and North Africa Program of the German Council on Foreign Relations (DGAP) – acting as the latter's in-house Iran expert. Currently, he is also an affiliated researcher with Freie Universität (FU) Berlin’s Center for Middle Eastern and North African Politics and a research associate at the Centre d’Études de la Coopération Internationale et du Développement (CECID) at Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB).

Fathollah-Nejad holds a Ph.D. in International Relations from the Department of Development Studies at SOAS (School of Oriental and African Studies), University of London, with a dissertation on Iran’s international relations in the 2000s in a changing world order. He has also taught courses on globalization and development in West Asia and North Africa, contemporary Iran, and the Arab Revolts, among others at FU Berlin’s Center for Middle Eastern and North African Politics, the University of Westminster and SOAS.

In addition to two monographs on the post-“9/11” U.S.–Iran conflict, he has written over 150 analytical pieces in English, German and French – with translations into almost a dozen languages. His work has been published worldwide, e.g. by PBS Newshour, Al Jazeera English, The Guardian, Cairo Review of Global Affairs, Middle East Institute (Washington, DC), The National Interest, openDemocracyJadaliyya, World Policy Journal, Frankfurter Allgemeine ZeitungNeue Zürcher Zeitung, Internationale Politik (IP), Der Tagesspiegeltaz, Huffington Post (France, Quebec & Germany editions), L’Orient-Le Jour, Géostratégiques, Mediapart, Insight Turkey, Iranian Diplomacy and the Palestine–Israel Journal of Politics, Economics and Culture.

He has given over 150 talks in English, German and French at academic (e.g. Harvard Kennedy School, SOAS, Imperial College London, Seoul National University Asia Center, University of Economics in Prague, Doha Institute for Graduate Studies, Texas A&M University at Qatar, Kadir Has University in Istanbul, Humboldt University of Berlin) and political institutions (e.g. European Parliament, House of Commons, German Federal Foreign Office, MED – Mediterranean Dialogues, University of Law in London, Vienna School of International Studies, Iranian Foreign Ministry think-tank IPIS).

Over the last decade, Fathollah-Nejad was part of several initiatives toward building a security architecture for the Middle East. He also provided consultancy on Iran-related issues for Members of the European Parliament and of the German Bundestag as well as on Middle East geopolitics for the International Crisis Group and for global risk consultancies, such as Control Risks (London). He was also outside evaluator for the International Broadcasting Bureau (IBB) of the Broadcasting Board of Governors (now the U.S. Agency for Global Media). He also served in evaluation committees for German Middle East Studies Association (DAVO) annual conferences. 

Ali Fathollah-Nejad is visiting fellow at the Brookings Doha Center. In the fall 2018 term, hewas also an adjunct assistant professor in the Ph.D. program of Qatar University’s Gulf Studies Center. Previously, he was a post-doctoral associate with the Harvard Kennedy School’s Iran Project and an associate fellow with the Middle East and North Africa Program of the German Council on Foreign Relations (DGAP) – acting as the latter’s in-house Iran expert. Currently, he is also an affiliated researcher with Freie Universität (FU) Berlin’s Center for Middle Eastern and North African Politics and a research associate at the Centre d’Études de la Coopération Internationale et du Développement (CECID) at Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB).

Fathollah-Nejad holds a Ph.D. in International Relations from the Department of Development Studies at SOAS (School of Oriental and African Studies), University of London, with a dissertation on Iran’s international relations in the 2000s in a changing world order. He has also taught courses on globalization and development in West Asia and North Africa, contemporary Iran, and the Arab Revolts, among others at FU Berlin’s Center for Middle Eastern and North African Politics, the University of Westminster and SOAS.

In addition to two monographs on the post-“9/11” U.S.–Iran conflict, he has written over 150 analytical pieces in English, German and French – with translations into almost a dozen languages. His work has been published worldwide, e.g. by PBS Newshour, Al Jazeera English, The Guardian, Cairo Review of Global Affairs, Middle East Institute (Washington, DC), The National Interest, openDemocracyJadaliyya, World Policy Journal, Frankfurter Allgemeine ZeitungNeue Zürcher Zeitung, Internationale Politik (IP), Der Tagesspiegeltaz, Huffington Post (France, Quebec & Germany editions), L’Orient-Le Jour, Géostratégiques, Mediapart, Insight Turkey, Iranian Diplomacy and the Palestine–Israel Journal of Politics, Economics and Culture.

He has given over 150 talks in English, German and French at academic (e.g. Harvard Kennedy School, SOAS, Imperial College London, Seoul National University Asia Center, University of Economics in Prague, Doha Institute for Graduate Studies, Texas A&M University at Qatar, Kadir Has University in Istanbul, Humboldt University of Berlin) and political institutions (e.g. European Parliament, House of Commons, German Federal Foreign Office, MED – Mediterranean Dialogues, University of Law in London, Vienna School of International Studies, Iranian Foreign Ministry think-tank IPIS).

Over the last decade, Fathollah-Nejad was part of several initiatives toward building a security architecture for the Middle East. He also provided consultancy on Iran-related issues for Members of the European Parliament and of the German Bundestag as well as on Middle East geopolitics for the International Crisis Group and for global risk consultancies, such as Control Risks (London). He was also outside evaluator for the International Broadcasting Bureau (IBB) of the Broadcasting Board of Governors (now the U.S. Agency for Global Media). He also served in evaluation committees for German Middle East Studies Association (DAVO) annual conferences. 

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