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Teacher Hanan Anzi poses for a picture with Syrian refugee students inside their classroom at one of the UNICEF schools at Al Zaatari refugee camp in the Jordanian city of Mafraq, near the border with Syria, September 22, 2015. Nearly three years after Taliban gunmen shot Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai, the teenage activist last week urged world leaders gathered in New York to help millions more children go to school. World Teachers' Day falls on 5 October, a Unesco initiative highlighting the work of educators struggling to teach children amid intimidation in Pakistan, conflict in Syria or poverty in Vietnam. Even so, there have been some improvements: the number of children not attending primary school has plummeted to an estimated 57 million worldwide in 2015, the U.N. says, down from 100 million 15 years ago. Reuters photographers have documented learning around the world, from well-resourced schools to pupils crammed into corridors in the Philippines, on boats in Brazil or in crowded classrooms in Burundi. REUTERS/ Muhammad HamedPICTURE 17 OF 47 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "SCHOOLS AROUND THE WORLD"SEARCH "EDUCATORS SCHOOLS" FOR ALL IMAGES - GF10000226442
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Charts of the week: Inclusive digital cities; Syrian refugee children not in school; digital mobility jobs

Here is this week’s selection of charts, graphs, or maps from Brookings experts’ research.

EIGHT INCLUSIVE DIGITAL CITIES, FROM COAST-TO-COAST

Jacob Whiton and Alan Berube of the Metropolitan Policy Program document eight U.S. metropolitan areas that are not only digital, but inclusive as well. These areas, they write, “offer glimpses of the promise tech holds for contributing to inclusive prosperity.”

Map - 8 digitally inclusive cities

 

ABOUT 2 OUT OF 5 SCHOOL-AGED SYRIAN REFUGEE CHILDREN ARE OUT OF SCHOOL

In a post on Brookings’s Future Development blog, World Bank researchers break down the numbers of refugees and asylum seekers worldwide, and the number of them who are children. For Syrian refugee children in neighboring states, 40 percent of the 1.7 million are out of school, a “situation that portends further social challenges for host countries and for Syria as refugees return.”

 

DIGITAL MOBILITY JOBS EMPLOY ABOUT 9.5 MILLION WORKERS

The Metropolitan Policy Program’s Joseph Kane and Adie Tomer examine who really would be impacted by autonomous vehicles (AVs) and say that it goes beyond only driving occupations. “All told,” they write, “we estimate that more than 9.5 million workers across 329 occupations in 2017—or more than 1 out of every 20 workers nationally—are likely directly exposed to changes in their work due to AVs and other digitalization. Most of these workers are not even drivers.”Workers in digital mobility by occupation category

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