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People vote at a polling place at the Canterbury Town Hall polling station in Canterbury, New Hampshire.
Brookings Now

Charts of the week: Congressional primaries, Canada’s First Nations population, and the market for child care

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HOW MANY TRUMP VOTERS CAST BALLOTS IN ILLINOIS’ 3RD CONGRESSIONAL PRIMARY?

Senior Fellow Elaine Kamarck and other members of The Primaries Project recently took a closer look at voting patterns in last month’s Illinois primary, and specifically, the 3rd Congressional District where incumbent Blue Dog Democrat Dan Lipinski was challenged by a more progressive candidate, Marie Newman. Through survey data and exit polls they found that Lipinski and Newman voters differed on few issues aside from their 2016 vote for president. In their analysis they wrote that Lipinski, who won just by just over 2,000 votes out of about 92,000 ballots cast, “enjoyed an advantage among Trump voters—so much so that nearly 1 in 5 Lipinski voters identified that they voted for the president (compared to just 1 in 20 of Newman voters).”

CANADA’S FIRST NATIONS WOMEN ARE DYING AT AN ALARMING RATE

According to Randall Akee, a David M. Rubenstein Fellow in the Economic Studies program, mortality rates among Canada’s First Nations people—those listed in Canada’s Indian Register—are consistently higher than the Canadian average in every age group. In “First People Lost: Determining the State of Status First Nations Mortality in Canada using Administrative Data,” Akee and Donna Feir find mortality rates for First Nations women to be nearly 400 percent of the average Canadian mortality rate in some age groups.

WHAT IS THE MARKET PRICE FOR DAYCARE AND PRESCHOOL?

In a new report, Senior Fellow Russ Whitehurst examines how much families with children under five years of age are spending on center-based child care (i.e., day care or preschool) and finds the percentage of children regularly attending such programs increasing dramatically with age. Of the children in his study’s sample, participation ranged from 13 percent among those that were less than one year old to 66 percent of four-year-olds.

Author

Chris McKenna

Communications Coordinator - Office of Communications

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