Richard Bejtlich is a nonresident senior fellow in the Center for 21st Century Security and Intelligence, part of the Foreign Policy program at Brookings. He is the chief security strategist at FireEye, and was Mandiant's chief security officer when FireEye acquired Mandiant in 2013. He is a former U.S. Air Force intelligence officer. His latest book is "The Practice of Network Security Monitoring" (No Starch Press, 2013).

Bejtlich’s research focuses on integrating strategic thought into private sector cyber defense. He asserts that computer networks are best protected by adopting strategies of rapid, holistic incident detection and response, and that intrusions are more like campaigns, not duels.

Bejtlich advises the cybersecurity start-ups Threat Stack and Sqrrl and blogs at taosecurity.blogspot.com.

Previously, Bejtlich was director of incident response for General Electric (GE), where he built and led the 40-member GE Computer Incident Response Team. Prior to GE, he operated TaoSecurity LLC as an independent consultant, protected national security interests for ManTech Corporation's Computer Forensics and Intrusion Analysis Division, investigated intrusions as part of Foundstone's incident response team, and monitored client networks for Ball Corporation. Bejtlich began his digital security career as a military intelligence officer in 1997 at the U.S. Air Force Computer Emergency Response Team, Air Force Information Warfare Center and Air Intelligence Agency.

Bejtlich has testified to the House Committee on Foreign Affairs, the House Committee on Homeland Security, the House Committee on Armed Services, the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, the House Financial Services Committee, the House Energy and Commerce Committee, the Senate Armed Services Committee, the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Government Affairs, and the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission. He has appeared on “Bloomberg West," the "Nightly Business Report," PBS "NewsHour," CNN and Wolf Blitzer's "Situation Room," "This Week in Defense News," "The Kojo Nnamdi Show," "To the Point," Federal News Radio, and BBC Radio. He has been interviewed and cited by The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, Forbes, Foreign Policy, and other newspapers and magazines. He appeared in the 2013 documentary film "Hacked," and won The Economist’s first online debate on cybersecurity. He has delivered guest lectures at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Georgetown University, U.S. Air Force Academy, U.S. Naval Academy, U.S. Military Academy, University of Cambridge, and other institutions. He has spoken at the Atlantic Council, Chatham House, Politico, the Center for National Policy, and other think tanks.

Bejtlich wrote "The Tao of Network Security Monitoring" (Addison-Wesley, 2004) and "Extrusion Detection: Security Monitoring for Internal Intrusions" (Addison-Wesley, 2005), and co-authored "Real Digital Forensics: Computer Security and Incident Response" (Addison-Wesley, 2005). His article Don't Underestimate Cyber Spies: How Virtual Espionage Can Lead to Actual Destruction appeared in Foreign Affairs in March 2013. He earned a Master of Public Policy from Harvard University, as well as a Bachelor of Science in history and a Bachelor of Science in political science from the United States Air Force Academy.

Richard Bejtlich is a nonresident senior fellow in the Center for 21st Century Security and Intelligence, part of the Foreign Policy program at Brookings. He is the chief security strategist at FireEye, and was Mandiant’s chief security officer when FireEye acquired Mandiant in 2013. He is a former U.S. Air Force intelligence officer. His latest book is “The Practice of Network Security Monitoring” (No Starch Press, 2013).

Bejtlich’s research focuses on integrating strategic thought into private sector cyber defense. He asserts that computer networks are best protected by adopting strategies of rapid, holistic incident detection and response, and that intrusions are more like campaigns, not duels.

Bejtlich advises the cybersecurity start-ups Threat Stack and Sqrrl and blogs at taosecurity.blogspot.com.

Previously, Bejtlich was director of incident response for General Electric (GE), where he built and led the 40-member GE Computer Incident Response Team. Prior to GE, he operated TaoSecurity LLC as an independent consultant, protected national security interests for ManTech Corporation’s Computer Forensics and Intrusion Analysis Division, investigated intrusions as part of Foundstone’s incident response team, and monitored client networks for Ball Corporation. Bejtlich began his digital security career as a military intelligence officer in 1997 at the U.S. Air Force Computer Emergency Response Team, Air Force Information Warfare Center and Air Intelligence Agency.

Bejtlich has testified to the House Committee on Foreign Affairs, the House Committee on Homeland Security, the House Committee on Armed Services, the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, the House Financial Services Committee, the House Energy and Commerce Committee, the Senate Armed Services Committee, the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Government Affairs, and the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission. He has appeared on “Bloomberg West,” the “Nightly Business Report,” PBS “NewsHour,” CNN and Wolf Blitzer’s “Situation Room,” “This Week in Defense News,” “The Kojo Nnamdi Show,” “To the Point,” Federal News Radio, and BBC Radio. He has been interviewed and cited by The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, Forbes, Foreign Policy, and other newspapers and magazines. He appeared in the 2013 documentary film “Hacked,” and won The Economist’s first online debate on cybersecurity. He has delivered guest lectures at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Georgetown University, U.S. Air Force Academy, U.S. Naval Academy, U.S. Military Academy, University of Cambridge, and other institutions. He has spoken at the Atlantic Council, Chatham House, Politico, the Center for National Policy, and other think tanks.

Bejtlich wrote “The Tao of Network Security Monitoring” (Addison-Wesley, 2004) and “Extrusion Detection: Security Monitoring for Internal Intrusions” (Addison-Wesley, 2005), and co-authored “Real Digital Forensics: Computer Security and Incident Response” (Addison-Wesley, 2005). His article Don’t Underestimate Cyber Spies: How Virtual Espionage Can Lead to Actual Destruction appeared in Foreign Affairs in March 2013. He earned a Master of Public Policy from Harvard University, as well as a Bachelor of Science in history and a Bachelor of Science in political science from the United States Air Force Academy.