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David R. Mares

Former Expert

David R. Mares holds the Institute of the Americas' chair for inter-American affairs, and is director of the Center for Iberian and Latin American Studies, professor of political science and adjunct professor at the School of International Relations/Pacific Studies at the University of California, San Diego. He is also the Baker Institute scholar for Latin American energy studies at the James A. Baker III Institute for Public Policy at Rice University. Mares was previously a professor at El Colegio de México (1980-1982), a Fulbright professor at the Universidad de Chile (1990) and a visiting professor at the Diplomatic Academy in Ecuador (1995). He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and the International Institute for Strategic Studies, and a associate fellow with the Inter-American Dialogue.

Mares has been a visiting scholar at the Oxford Institute for Energy Studies at Oxford University and the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs at Harvard University; a fellow at the Japan External Trade Research Organization and the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University; and held a Pew Faculty Fellowship in International Affairs. He was previously a president of the Research Committee on Armed Forces and Society of the International Political Science Association, editor of the series Latin America: Social Sciences and the Law (Routledge Press) and a member of the editorial board of the Latin American Research Review.

Mares’ research and teaching interests include Latin American energy politics, the political economy of drug policy, defense policy, civil-military relations and the use of photographic imagery in politics. He is the author and/or editor of nine books and more than a hundred articles and chapters. Mares has written reports for the Stimson Institute, the Carnegie Commission on Preventing Deadly Conflict, the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, Netherlands Institute of International Relations (The Hague), the Conflict Prevention Network (Berlin), the Arias Foundation for Peace and Human Progress (Costa Rica) and the Paraguayan Center for the Promotion of Economic Liberty and Social Justice.

Mares recently co-authored a book with Harold Trinkunas, nonresident senior fellow in the Latin America Initiative, on the attempt by Brazil to use soft power to rise to major power status in the international system titled, "Aspirational Power: Brazil on the Long Road to Global Influence." This project is supported by a Minerva grant of the U.S. Department of Defense. Mares is also writing a book on resource nationalism in the oil and gas sector in Latin America after 1980. He is co-editing the "Routledge Handbook of Latin American Security Studies" with Arie Kacowicz of Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Mares is also a member of the team working on “Early Model-based Event Recognition using Surrogates,” (PI: N. Ramakrishnan, Virginia Tech,), funded by the Open Source Indicators Program under the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity in the Office of the Director of National Intelligence.

David R. Mares holds the Institute of the Americas’ chair for inter-American affairs, and is director of the Center for Iberian and Latin American Studies, professor of political science and adjunct professor at the School of International Relations/Pacific Studies at the University of California, San Diego. He is also the Baker Institute scholar for Latin American energy studies at the James A. Baker III Institute for Public Policy at Rice University. Mares was previously a professor at El Colegio de México (1980-1982), a Fulbright professor at the Universidad de Chile (1990) and a visiting professor at the Diplomatic Academy in Ecuador (1995). He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and the International Institute for Strategic Studies, and a associate fellow with the Inter-American Dialogue.

Mares has been a visiting scholar at the Oxford Institute for Energy Studies at Oxford University and the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs at Harvard University; a fellow at the Japan External Trade Research Organization and the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University; and held a Pew Faculty Fellowship in International Affairs. He was previously a president of the Research Committee on Armed Forces and Society of the International Political Science Association, editor of the series Latin America: Social Sciences and the Law (Routledge Press) and a member of the editorial board of the Latin American Research Review.

Mares’ research and teaching interests include Latin American energy politics, the political economy of drug policy, defense policy, civil-military relations and the use of photographic imagery in politics. He is the author and/or editor of nine books and more than a hundred articles and chapters. Mares has written reports for the Stimson Institute, the Carnegie Commission on Preventing Deadly Conflict, the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, Netherlands Institute of International Relations (The Hague), the Conflict Prevention Network (Berlin), the Arias Foundation for Peace and Human Progress (Costa Rica) and the Paraguayan Center for the Promotion of Economic Liberty and Social Justice.

Mares recently co-authored a book with Harold Trinkunas, nonresident senior fellow in the Latin America Initiative, on the attempt by Brazil to use soft power to rise to major power status in the international system titled, “Aspirational Power: Brazil on the Long Road to Global Influence.” This project is supported by a Minerva grant of the U.S. Department of Defense. Mares is also writing a book on resource nationalism in the oil and gas sector in Latin America after 1980. He is co-editing the “Routledge Handbook of Latin American Security Studies” with Arie Kacowicz of Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Mares is also a member of the team working on “Early Model-based Event Recognition using Surrogates,” (PI: N. Ramakrishnan, Virginia Tech,), funded by the Open Source Indicators Program under the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity in the Office of the Director of National Intelligence.

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