May 29

Past Event

The Politics of Marijuana Legalization

Video

Highlights

  • Marijuana Policy and States’ Rights

    E.J. Dionne, Jr.: Democrats and liberals don’t want the federal government to enforce federal anti-marijuana laws because they are sympathetic to legalization. Republicans and conservatives don’t want federal anti-marijuana law because they are sympathetic to states’ rights.

    E.J. Dionne, Jr.

  • 72% of Americans Say Enforcing Marijuana Laws Too Costly

    William A. Galston: 72% of Americans now believe that government efforts to enforce marijuana laws cost more than they are worth. This consensus includes a majority of every population sub-group we examined.

    William A. Galston

  • Marijuana Legalization Attitude Based on Personal Experience

    Anna Greenberg, Greenberg Quinlan Rosner Research: Personal experience is hard to change; if personal experiences lead some to have a particular attitude about marijuana legalization, they are not particularly persuadable.

  • Marijuana Laws Shaped by New Cultural Depictions of Marijuana Use

    Sean Trende, RealClear Politics: This really isn’t the liberal or libertarian culture shift; it’s the way marijuana is argued about in society. If there is an interest in pushing this issue forward, the real lesson is that it has to be framed to appeal to the middle class.

Full Event

  • The Politics of Marijuana Legalization

    On May 29th, Governance Studies at Brookings and the Washington Office on Latin America hosted a public forum to discuss changing attitudes towards marijuana legalization.

    E.J. Dionne, Jr., William A. Galston and Jonathan Rauch

Audio

Brookings Multimedia content requires JavaScript. Your browser either doesn't have JavaScript or doesn't have it enabled.

Instructions to enable JavaScript.

Summary

Last November, Colorado and Washington became the first two states to legalize marijuana, and they may not be the last: legalization now has the support of about half the country, up from 25 percent two decades ago. But legalization remains controversial among the public and contrary to federal law and policy. Is a new national consensus emerging, or a new stage of the culture war? Either way, what are the implications?

On May 29th, Governance Studies at Brookings and the Washington Office on Latin America hosted a public forum to discuss changing attitudes towards marijuana legalization. Brookings Senior Fellows William Galston and E.J. Dionne presented findings of a detailed study of evidence from opinion surveys, some of it newly available.

Follow the conversation at #MJLegalization.

Event Agenda

Details

May 29, 2013

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM EDT

Brookings Institution

Saul/Zilkha Rooms

1775 Massachusetts Avenue NW

Map

Join the Conversation

#MJLegalization

Related Paper: The New Politics of Marijuana Legalization