Feb 5

Past Event

Religion and American Foreign Policy: Prophetic, Perilous, Inevitable

Event Materials

Summary

No one can now doubt the power of religion in international affairs. Can religious convictions guide a moral foreign policy? Do they lead to fanaticism? Do they promote an unrealistic view of the world? Yet religious motivations are also behind movements on behalf of human rights, democratization, debt relief, and assistance to poor countries. The theory of just war also owes a great debt to theology.

How do religious or moral traditions help us define what sort of intervention—military and non-military (e.g., foreign aid, economic sanctions)—is required, and to what purpose? What are the moral traditions from which we should draw in order to understand America's obligations? How do groups with different moral traditions influence the formation of U.S. foreign policy?

Join us for a discussion of the role of religion and ethics in American foreign policy.

Moderator:
E.J. DIONNE JR.
Senior Fellow, Governance Studies, The Brookings Institution; Columnist, Washington Post; Co-chair, the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life

Presenters:
FR. BRYAN HEHIR
President, Catholic Charities, USA; Distinguished Professor of Ethics and International Affairs, School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University

MICHAEL WALZER
Professor, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ; Author, Just and Unjust Wars and Spheres of Justice: A Defense of Pluralism and Equality

Respondents:
CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER
Columnist, Washington Post

JAMES M. LINDSAY
Senior Fellow, Foreign Policy Studies, The Brookings Institution; Co-author, Defending America: The Case for Limited National Missile Defense

LOUISE RICHARDSON
Executive Dean, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University; Author, When Allies Differ: Anglo-American Relations in the Suez and Falkland Crises

Details

February 5, 2003

10:00 AM - 12:00 PM EST

The Brookings Institution

Falk Auditorium

1775 Massachusetts Ave., NW

Map

For More Information

Brookings Office of Communications

(202) 797-6105