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Future of Children Research

REDUCING JUSTICE SYSTEM INEQUALITY, SPRING 2018 RESEARCH REPORT

In the newest edition of the jointly-published Princeton-Brookings “Future of Children” journal, leading experts examine how the justice system exacerbates inequality and its effects on children and youth and propose solutions to mitigate these effects.

Though the United States is home to many vulnerable children and youth, two groups especially in need of attention and assistance are those who have a parent incarcerated and those in the foster care system. These young people face disproportionately large hurdles that will likely undermine not only their wellbeing as children and youth, but also their development over the course of their lives.

In “Helping Children with Parents in Prison and Children in Foster Care,” a featured policy brief released alongside the journal, John H. Laub, of the University of Maryland, College Park, and Brookings Senior Fellow Ron Haskins suggest a number of policies that could help children with incarcerated parents and children in foster care, who disproportionately come from poor and minority households.

Overall, they write, a rigorous system of targeting, testing, and tracking could determine which problems are causing the most harm for these groups of children, develop and test intervention programs to tackle those problems, and assess the children’s progress.

Read the full journal on the Future of Children website.

You can also visit this page to watch video from the journal’s May 9 launch at Brookings.


Past Editions of The Future of Children

Social and Emotional Learning (Vol. 27, no. 1)


Starting Early: Education from Prekindergarten to Third Grade (Vol. 26, no. 2)


Children and Climate Change (Vol. 26, no. 1)


Marriage and Child Wellbeing Revisited (Vol. 25, no. 2)


Policies to Promote Child Health (Vol. 25, no. 1)


Childhood Food Insecurity in the U.S: Trends, Causes, and Policy Options (Fall 2014 Research Report)


Helping Parents, Helping Children: Two-Generation Mechanisms (Vol. 24, no. 1)


Military Families (Vol. 23, no. 2)


Postsecondary Education (Vol. 23, no. 1)


Literacy Challenges (Vol. 22, no. 2)


Children with Disabilities (Vol. 22, no. 1)


Work and Family (Vol. 21, no. 2)


Immigrant Children (Vol. 21, no. 1)


Fragile Families (Vol. 20, no. 2)


Transition to Adulthood (Vol. 20, no. 1)


Preventing Child Maltreatment (Vol. 19, no. 2)


America’s High Schools (Vol. 19, no. 1)


Juvenile Justice (Vol. 18, no. 2)


Children and Electronic Media (Vol. 18, no. 1)


The Next Generation of Antipoverty Policies (Vol. 17, no. 2)


Excellence in the Classroom (Vol. 17, no. 1)


Opportunity in America (Vol. 16, no. 2)


Childhood Obesity (Vol. 16, no. 1)


Marriage and Child Wellbeing (Vol. 15, no. 2)


School Readiness: Closing Racial and Ethnic Gaps (Vol. 15, no. 1)


View previous journal issues

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