Article

The Evolution of Post-conflict Recovery

Sultan Barakat

Recent history has been marked by the rise of post-conflict intervention as a component of military and foreign policy, as a form of humanitarianism, and as a challenge to Westphalian notions of state sovereignty. The terms of debate, the history of the discipline, and the evolution of scholarship and practice remain relatively under-examined, particularly in the post-9/11 period in which post-conflict recovery came to be construed as an extension of conflict and as a domain concerned principally with the national security of predominantly Western countries.

The subsequent politicization of post-conflict recovery and entry of post-conflict assistance into the political economy of conflict have fundamentally changed policy making and practice. The authors argue that research into post-conflict recovery, which must become increasingly rigorous and theoretically grounded, should detach itself from the myriad political agendas which have sought to impose themselves upon war-torn countries. The depoliticization of post-conflict recovery, the authors conclude, may benefit from an increasingly structured “architecture of integrated, directed recovery.”

Read the full article in Third World Quarterly »