Sep 8

Past Event

Meet the Press at Brookings: The Impact of 9/11 Ten Years On

Event Materials

Video

Highlights

  • Little Progress in Dealing with Interrogation and Detention

    Benjamin Wittes: There’s been some forward motion in dealing with the interrogation, detention and litigation against alleged terrorists, but it’s remarkable how little progress we’ve actually made.

    Daniel L. Byman

  • A Nuclear Iran will Open Door for Regional Proliferation

    Michael Doran: When Iran becomes a nuclear power, it will open the door for many other countries in the region to pursue their own nuclear agenda.

    Michael Doran

  • Failure of U.S. Leadership in Muslim World

    Shadi Hamid: On issues pertaining to the Muslim world, the U.S. has failed to show decisive leadership; and it’s this lack of leadership that fuels the love-hate relationship that Arabs have with the U.S.

    Shadi Hamid

  • What Was Iran's Lesson from 9/11?

    Suzanne Maloney: Iran’s takeaway from 9/11 was that it needed to rid itself of old adversaries while forging new alliances.

  • Lip Service only to Terrorism in Afghanistan

    Vanda Felbab-Brown: The Obama administration seems to have only paid lip service to dealing with terrorism in Afghanistan in a truly comprehensive fashion.

    Vanda Felbab-Brown

  • Continued 9/11 Fallout for South Asia

    Teresita Schaffer: The U.S., Pakistan and India continue to wrestle with the fallout from 9/11 and its impact on their complicated relationships.

    Teresita C. Schaffer

  • What Is a Victory Against Terrorism?

    Robert Kagan: In this post 9/11 world, we need to define what it means to score a victory against the forces of extremism.

    Robert Kagan

  • U.S. Retrenchment Unlikely

    Michael O’Hanlon: The U.S. is “war weary” but if another situation should arise, it’s unlikely that our global neighbors will allow us to retrench.

    Michael E. O'Hanlon

  • Little Progress in Dealing with Interrogation and Detention

    Benjamin Wittes: There’s been some forward motion in dealing with the interrogation, detention and litigation against alleged terrorists, but it’s remarkable how little progress we’ve actually made.

    Benjamin Wittes

  • A Perception of Decline of U.S. Influence

    Shibley Telhami: There’s a perception that American influence has declined over the past decade and that’s largely attributed to some of the actions the U.S. took following the 9/11 attacks.

    Shibley Telhami

  • History Will Judge America's Actions

    Bruce Riedel:  History will judge America’s post-9/11 actions and will certainly pose the question. ”Why did the U.S. invade Iraq?”

    Bruce Riedel

Audio

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Summary

In the coming days, America and the world will mark the tenth anniversary of the 2001 al Qaeda attacks on the United States. Over the past ten years, these attacks served as a catalyst for major shifts in U.S. defense, foreign and national security policies, including the U.S. approach to South Asia and the Middle East. This tenth anniversary provides a unique opportunity to reflect on how the 9/11 attacks changed U.S. policy approaches over the past ten years – and how they are still shaping U.S. policy decisions today.

On September 8, Foreign Policy at Brookings and NBC’s Meet the Press hosted a discussion focusing on the legacy of September 11, 2001. David Gregory, host of NBC’s Meet the Press, moderated the two-panel session which explored the long-term impact of 9/11 on U.S. interests abroad; relations with Europe, South Asia, and the countries of the Middle East; and the U.S. missions in Iraq and Afghanistan. Panelists also discussed the impact of 9/11 within South Asia and the Middle East, examining a decade of change in countries such as Afghanistan, Pakistan, Iraq, Iran and Syria.

After each panel, the panelists took audience questions.

Event Agenda

Details

September 8, 2011

10:00 AM - 12:00 PM EDT

The Brookings Institution

Falk Auditorium

1775 Massachusetts Ave., NW

Map

For More Information

Brookings Office of Communications

(202) 797-6105