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Alejandro J. Ganimian is an Assistant Professor of Applied Psychology and Economics at New York University's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. His work focuses on how to reform the incentives, capacity, and supports of school systems in developing countries to improve student learning. He uses field experiments to evaluate education programs and policies that strengthen school management and classroom instruction to address the needs of children and youth from pre-school to secondary school. Specifically, his work seeks to advance knowledge on how to: (a) encourage schools to ensure all students master foundational skills; (b) support teachers to make instruction of heterogeneous student groups manageable; and (c) provide additional scaffolding to the most disadvantaged children and youth.
He holds a doctorate in Quantitative Policy Analysis in Education from Harvard University, where he was a fellow in the Multidisciplinary Program in Inequality and Social Policy; a master’s in Educational Research from the University of Cambridge, where he was a Gates Scholar; and a bachelor’s in International Politics from Georgetown University. He was also a post-doctoral fellow at the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL).
Alejandro is currently a Non-Resident Fellow at the Center for Universal Education at the Brookings Institution; a Special Invitee of the regional office of J-PAL for Latin America and the Caribbean; and a member of the Advisory Board of the Organization of Ibero-American States for Education, Science, and Culture (OEI). He has worked as a consultant for multiple international organizations, including the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the World Bank, and the Inter-American Development Bank, among others.
Alejandro J. Ganimian is an Assistant Professor of Applied Psychology and Economics at New York University’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. His work focuses on how to reform the incentives, capacity, and supports of school systems in developing countries to improve student learning. He uses field experiments to evaluate education programs and policies that strengthen school management and classroom instruction to address the needs of children and youth from pre-school to secondary school. Specifically, his work seeks to advance knowledge on how to: (a) encourage schools to ensure all students master foundational skills; (b) support teachers to make instruction of heterogeneous student groups manageable; and (c) provide additional scaffolding to the most disadvantaged children and youth.
He holds a doctorate in Quantitative Policy Analysis in Education from Harvard University, where he was a fellow in the Multidisciplinary Program in Inequality and Social Policy; a master’s in Educational Research from the University of Cambridge, where he was a Gates Scholar; and a bachelor’s in International Politics from Georgetown University. He was also a post-doctoral fellow at the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL).
Alejandro is currently a Non-Resident Fellow at the Center for Universal Education at the Brookings Institution; a Special Invitee of the regional office of J-PAL for Latin America and the Caribbean; and a member of the Advisory Board of the Organization of Ibero-American States for Education, Science, and Culture (OEI). He has worked as a consultant for multiple international organizations, including the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the World Bank, and the Inter-American Development Bank, among others.
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