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The 2010 Census: What State, Local, and Tribal Governments Need to Know

The nation’s state, local, and Tribal governments have a vital interest in seeing that the U.S. Census Bureau conducts a complete, accurate 2010 Census.

  • Representation in Congress, state legislatures, and local councils will be based on 2010 population counts.
  • Nearly $300 billion annually in federal program funds will be distributed to state, local, and Tribal governments based on data collected in the 2010 Census.
  • Government planners will use 2010 Census data to assess needs and plan for schools, road and transit improvement and construction, health care facilities, disaster response and evacuation, recreational facilities, and a host of other community services.
  • Businesses will rely on 2010 census data to determine where they will locate, hire, and invest.

    Although the census is three years away, state, local, and Tribal governments need to take steps now to ensure that they receive their fair share of political representation and federal funds over the coming decade and that they have available to them the data they need for effective planning.

    The Brookings Institution’s Metropolitan Policy Program, the Population Resource Center, and The Census Project hosted this briefing on the 2010 Census so that the Washington-based representatives of state, local, and Tribal Governments might learn:

  • why an accurate census is important,
  • the role and responsibilities of state, local, and Tribal governments in work with the Census Bureau to prepare for the census, and
  • the steps that state, local, and Tribal governments can take to ensure that the census is a success.
  • Agenda

    Moderator

    Panelists

    Joseph Salvo

    Chief Demographer - NYC Department of City Planning

    More Information

    Contact
    (202) 797-6105

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