book

Global Cities

A Short History

By Greg Clark
clark global cities

Why have some cities become great global centers, and which cities will be future leaders? What explains the rise and fall of global cities?

From Athens and Rome in ancient times to New York and Singapore today, a handful of cities have stood out as centers of economic, military, cultural or political power beyond their regions or nations. In the twenty-first century, the number of globalizing cities is greater than ever before. New technologies and shifting geo-politics enable more cities to attract global talent and capital, lead in the hosting of new advanced industries, and achieve global recognition and influence.

In Global Cities: A Short History, Greg Clark, an internationally renowned global urbanist, examines the enduring forces—such as trade, migration, diversity and technology—that have enabled some cities to emerge from the pack into global leadership. Much more than an historical review, Clark’s book looks to the future, examining the new waves that are transforming cities around the world as well as the emerging challenges that global cities will face.

Which cities will be the global leaders of tomorrow? What are the common issues and opportunities they will face? What kinds of leadership can make these cities competitive and resilient? Clark offers answers to these and similar questions in a book that will be of interest to anyone who lives in or is influenced by the world’s great concentrations of people and capital.

Clark was trained as an economist, a social and political scientist, and a city and regional planner at Cambridge University, UK, at Columbia University, New York, and at the London School of Economics. 
Clark was trained as an economist, a social and political scientist, and a city and regional planner at Cambridge University, UK, at Columbia University, New York, and at the London School of Economics. 
Get daily updates from Brookings

Related Books