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Charts of the week: How minorities view their schools, HBCUs, and funding for multinational organizations

Click on the links or on the charts to go to the full research.

 

BLACK AND NATIVE AMERICANS BELIEVE THEIR LOCAL PUBLIC SCHOOLS ARE WORSE OFF THAN THOSE IN OTHER PLACES

Governance Studies Fellow Elizabeth Mann and Logan Casey, a research associate in public opinion at the Harvard Opinion Research Program, analyzed the results of a new survey produced by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health on how racial and ethnic minorities view public education in the U.S. The chart below illustrates how racial groups believe their local schools compare to schools in other neighborhoods, and suggests that nearly a third (31 percent) of African-Americans think public schools are worse where they live than elsewhere.

MAJORITY-BLACK CITIES WITH AN HBCU TEND TO HAVE HIGHER MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOMES COMPARED TO ALL MAJORITY-BLACK CITIES

In his research on majority-black cities in the United States, Andre Perry, a David M. Rubenstein fellow in the Metropolitan Policy Program, found that cities with a historically black college or university (HBCU) tend to be in the upper half of the income distribution of all black cities, but still below the median household income across all races. According to Perry, this evidence might suggest that HBCUs are a competitive asset to small- and medium-sized black cities.

metro_20171114_median incomes black cities Andre Perry new

NORWAY CONTRIBUTES THE MOST PER CAPITA TO MULTINATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

In their new report, “Who funds which multilateral organizations?” Brookings Senior Fellow John McArthur and Research Analyst Krista Rasmussen analyze how much individual nations and the Bill and Malinda Gates Foundation contribute to 53 multilateral organizations through recurrent grants. The authors find that after excluding some smaller funders with high per capita contributions, Norway, Sweden, and Denmark contribute the most per person. The United States contributes the most money to the multilateral system overall, $14.1 billion per year, but ranks 20th overall in contributions per capita.

Figure 2 Average per capita annual contributions to 53 multilaterals, 2014-16

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Chris McKenna

Communications Coordinator - Office of Communications

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