REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque - A child holds U.S. and South Korean flags prior to the state arrival of South Korean President Lee Myung-bak at the White House in Washington, October 13, 2011.

Past Event

The Seventh Seoul-Washington Forum: U.S.-Korea-Japan Relations, Unification, and Green Politics

September 18, 2014

On September 18, the Center for East Asia Policy Studies at Brookings and The Korea Foundation hosted the seventh Seoul-Washington Forum. Leading experts from South Korea and the United States examined strategic changes in the region and what this means for the U.S. rebalance to Asia, challenges related to U.S.-Korea-Japan relations, the politics of unification, and South Korea’s leadership in green economy and climate change.

  • In the News

    My guess is that [former Korean sex workers] chose to frame the U.S. military prostitution issue to ride the coattails of the Japanese ‘comfort women’ or 'jeongsindae' movement. They could have assumed — I have no proof — that there might be public sympathy or understanding, since the Japanese ‘comfort women’ issue is well-known nationally and internationally. But I think it was a mistake to choose that term. It undercuts the jeongsindae case and confuses the public.

    September 11, 2014, Katharine H.S. Moon, Global Post
  • Opinion | The Chosun Ilbo

    China: Perception versus Reality

    August 18, 2014, Katharine H.S. Moon

  • Interview | Yonhap News Agency

    July 14, 2014, Katharine H.S. Moon

  • Interview | Radio Television Hong Kong

    China Shifts from North to South Korea

    July 24, 2014, Jonathan D. Pollack

  • In the News

    Staying quiet [about a movie that mocks Kim Jong Un] would be an act of cowardice and defeat – that ‘violating’ the sacredness of the Kim family and the leadership of the North Korean people is OK. That is not an option for [the Kim regime].

    July 23, 2014, Katharine H.S. Moon, Voice of America
  • In the News

    [Kim Jong Un] is so tightly guarded. But the more practical concern is the debasement of Kim's standing and legitimacy. His youth, lack of experience, lack of secure contacts and friendships with foreign leaders put him in a precarious position. He has to earn the respect and trust of the older military and Korean Worker’s Party leaders.

    July 23, 2014, Katharine H.S. Moon, Voice of America
  • In the News

    The Chinese have let anti-Kim and anti-North Korea expressions run free in China's cyberworld and to a lesser degree in print news. North Korea has recently lambasted China publicly, partly for the unofficial oil embargo and partly for dissing it by cozying it up with South Korean president Park Geun-hye. There's mutual distrust and frustration, if not hostility, between China and North Korea.

    July 23, 2014, Katharine H.S. Moon, Voice of America
  • In the News

    Kim Jong Il got plenty of buffoonery thrown at him – the hair, the shoes, the movies, the women, the weight. But he was the immediate heir to the 'Great Leader,' and he had decades to build up experience and political support. Kim [Jong Un] shows no sense of humor, no ease.

    July 23, 2014, Katharine H.S. Moon, Voice of America

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