South Korea

Blog Post

Before moving to "no first use," think about Northeast Asia

July 20, 2016, Jonathan D. Pollack and Richard C. Bush III

As President Obama approaches his final six months in office, senior officials are purportedly deliberating additional policy changes that they believe could be undertaken without congressional approval, including U.S. enunciation of a nuclear “no first use” doctrine. That would bear directly on the credibility of U.S. guarantees to allies in Europe and Asia, with particular relevance in Northeast Asia. 

  • In the News

    Regardless of Chinese objections [to the deployment of THAAD], I don’t see South Korea turning back on this decision.

    July 21, 2016, Jonathan D. Pollack, Christian Science Monitor
  • In the News

    I certainly don’t believe THAAD or any missile defense is a panacea, [b]ut if it inhibits North Korea, under some extreme circumstances, from using its capabilities, and instills some confidence in the government of South Korea to defend key assets and population areas in a more integrated fashion, then it’ll be money well spent.

    July 21, 2016, Jonathan D. Pollack, Christian Science Monitor
  • In the News

    [While the true extent of North Korea's threat toward South Korea is difficult to fathom,] to assume benign intentions would be imprudent.

    July 21, 2016, Jonathan D. Pollack, Christian Science Monitor
  • Opinion

    Youth & politics in East Asia

    June 30, 2016, Paul Park, Maeve Whelan-Wuest and Katharine H.S. Moon

  • Opinion | East Asia Forum

    June 19, 2016, Katharine H.S. Moon

  • In the News

    [Korea] has been a homogeneous society linguistically, culturally, for so long. It has prided itself on the purity of the bloodline, the so-called bloodline. Right now, [integration] is about fitting into the Korean context, learning Korean language and not teaching your kids Vietnamese or Tagalog or some other foreign language. True multiculturalism would involve mixing and blending and fusing of different languages, cultures, customs. We don't see much of that — except in places like Wongok Village.

    May 15, 2016, Katharine H.S. Moon, National Public Radio
  • In the News

    This is where any responsible U.S. leader and especially the president has to be very careful not only in what he or she says but in what he or she does, because you don’t want to put an ally in that kind of a position. Of course if Mr. Trump threatens the stability of the U.S.-Korea or U.S.-Japan alliance, Japan and Korea will have to recalibrate what is in their best interests vis-à-vis China and the rest of the world, but they don’t want to be put in that position, and the United States certainly—it is not in our interest—to put them in that position.

    May 13, 2016, Katharine H.S. Moon, The Takeaway
  • In the News

    Las emisiones no llegan muy lejos, pero si alcanzan los oídos del personal militar de la DMZ (zona desmilitarizada) y la ciudad de Kaesong. El gobierno surcoreano intenta que la música distraiga a los soldados y también les transmite noticias alternativas (a las que difunde el régimen). Pero a largo plazo, esta táctica pierde efectividad porque la gente se acostumbra a ella.

    May 6, 2016, Katharine H.S. Moon, El Mundo

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