SERIES: The Bernard L. Schwartz Forum on U.S. Competitiveness | No. 4 of 4 « Previous

Dec 10

Past Event

Infrastructure Investments, Economic Growth and Jobs

Event Materials

Video

Highlights

  • Infrastructure Requires Creative Approaches

    Strobe Talbott: In this era of fiscal restraint, infrastructure is a challenge for rebuilding the U.S. economy and it''s one that requires creative and new approaches to long-term investment.

    Strobe Talbott

  • Infrastructure Investment Critical to Build Economy

    Bruce Katz: Metros need federal funding to help create jobs that build an economy of the future; infrastructure investment is critical to this effort.

    Bruce Katz

  • U.S. Must Commit to Infrastructure Investment

    The Honorable Keith Ellison (D-Minn.): The nation must commit to investing in infrastructure and to change how it finances these important projects.

  • Stimulus Bill Key for Infrastructure Projects

    Beverly Scott: The stimulus bill has been key for infrastructure projects; an influx of cash for capital ventures doesn''t do much without funding for maintenance and operations.

  • National Infrastructure Bank an Option

    Hon. Ray LaHood, U.S. Sec. of Transportation: The nation needs new ways to pay for its infrastructure; the National Infrastructure Bank offers one option for funding many of these critical projects.

Audio

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Summary

Rebuilding the U.S. economy in an era of fiscal restraint requires creative and new approaches to long-term investment and infrastructure financing. Yet with the specter of a jobless recovery looming, Washington has been casting about for ways to put Americans back to work—with infrastructure spending a prominent part of that discussion.

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act offered substantial funding for infrastructure but did not address the major flaws in how those funds were dispersed. Over the years, both a federal capital budget and a National Infrastructure Bank have been proposed as solutions to reforming the federal investment process.

On December 10, the Metropolitan Policy Program at Brookings hosted a discussion on the connection between infrastructure investments and economic growth, including the release of a paper, Investing for Success: Examining a Federal Capital Budget and a National Infrastructure Bank, which examines the merits and intersections of the capital budget and National Infrastructure Bank concepts. Rep. Keith Ellison (D-Minn.) offered opening remarks. U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood outlined current federal reform efforts. The Economist’s Charlotte Howard moderated a panel discussion on reforming federal investments in infrastructure at a time when the pressure for jobs in the near term is intense.

Read Investing for Success: Examining a Federal Capital Budget and a National Infrastructure Bank »

Congressman Keith Ellison (D-Minn.)
United States Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood
Congressman Keith Ellison (D-Minn.)
United States Secretary of
Transportation Ray LaHood

Event Agenda

  • Welcome

  • Opening Remarks

    • The Honorable Keith Ellison (D-Minn.)

      U.S. House of Representatives

  • Panel Discussion

    • Moderator: Charlotte Howard

      The Economist

    • Reed Hundt

      Co-Chairman, Coalition for a Green Bank

      Former Chairman, Federal Communications Commission

    • John Irons

      Research and Policy Director, Economic Policy Institute

    • Portrait: Rob Puentes
    • Beverly Scott

      General Manager and CEO, Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority

  • Closing Remarks

    • The Honorable Ray LaHood

      United States Secretary of Transportation

Details

December 10, 2009

11:00 AM - 12:45 PM EST

The Brookings Institution

Falk Auditorium

1775 Massachusetts Ave., NW

Map

For More Information

Brookings Office of Communications

(202) 797-6105

SERIES: The Bernard L. Schwartz Forum on U.S. Competitiveness | No. 4