• Brookings Now

    What we’ve learned from Brookings experts about the recent SCOTUS decisions

    Tourists watch as television news crews report on decisions handed down on the last day of the term at the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington June 29, 2015 (REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst).

    June 2015 was a busy month for the U.S. Supreme Court: from gay rights to congressional redistricting, the highest court in the land handed down historic decisions that will change the course of the nation—and the conversations that 2016 presidential contenders are having about it. 

    Here’s what Brookings experts have told us so far about these landmark cases.


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    A summer reading list from the Brookings Press

    Santa Monica College English Department Assistant Ginger Pennington reads a book while lying on the lawn at Santa Monica College in Santa Monica (REUTERS/Bret Hartman).

    If you’re still compiling your summer reading list, let us help! The Brookings Press has you covered with some noteworthy new titles. 


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    10 things we learned at Brookings in June

    OK-10 scenic signage in Adair County, Oklahoma, just south of the Adair/Delaware county line. (Wikimedia Commons, Scott5114)

    The Communications team here at Brookings mined the over 300 new content items published on brookings.edu in June to come up with this vein of 10 very interesting findings.  Read More

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    Watch the first Brookings Debate: Should the U.S. put boots on the ground to fight ISIS?

    On Wednesday, June 24, Brookings was proud to host the inaugural Brookings Debate: "Should the U.S. put boots on the ground to fight ISIS?" Arguing in favor were Brookings expert Michael O’Hanlon and Michael Doran of the Hudson Institute, and taking the opposite approach were Brookings’ Jeremy Shapiro and Senator Chris Murphy (D-CT), who is currently working to submit an amendment to prohibit boots on the ground with explicit congressional approval.  Read More

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    Your reading list for Wednesday’s Brookings Debate: Should the U.S. put boots on the ground to fight ISIS?

    The Brookings Debate

    Before you watch next Wednesday's Brookings Debate, learn more from the debate participants about arguments for an against direct U.S. intervention in the fight against ISIS.

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    Sesame Street was the original MOOC

    U.S. first lady Michelle Obama hugs PBS Sesame Street characters Elmo and Rosita after delivering remarks on marketing healthier foods to children at the White House in Washington October 30, 2013 ( REUTERS/Yuri Gripas).

    New research from Brookings Senior Fellow Melissa Kearney and Wellesley College’s Phillip Levine shows that children living in places where the broadcast signal for Sesame Street was strong were 14 percent less likely to be behind in school compared to children living in places with a weak signal reception. 

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    Andrew Zimbalist explains how FIFA treats the Women’s World Cup differently than the Men’s

    Jun 8, 2015; Winnipeg, Manitoba: Nigeria forward Francisca Ordega heads a ball against Sweden defender Lina Nilsson in a Group D soccer match in the 2015 women's World Cup at Winnipeg Stadium. (USA TODAY Sports Images, TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

    The 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup is underway in six cities across Canada, the first time that country has hosted the event. Twenty-four teams are competing for the trophy, to be awarded July 5, in venues in Vancouver, Edmonton, Winnipeg, Ottawa, Montreal, and Moncton. With so much attention paid to the recent FIFA bribery scandal that has included the arrest of many senior officials and the resignation of FIFA President Sepp Blatter, I recently had the good fortune to ask noted economist Andrew Zimbalist a few questions about the Women’s World Cup tournament. Zimbalist, the Robert A. Woods Professor of Economics at Smith College, is author of numerous books and articles on the economics of sports, including his most recent title published by the Brookings Institution Press, “Circus Maximus: The Economic Gamble Behind Hosting the Olympics and the World Cup.”  Read More

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    Michael O'Hanlon: keep limited U.S. forces in Afghanistan indefinitely

    Afghanistan president Ashraf Ghani (R) and Abdullah Abdullah, chief executive officer, pray during a memorial ceremony of Saturday suicide attack in Jalalabad, April 23, 2015. (REUTERS/ Parwiz)

    “We have earned the right to stay [in Afghanistan],” said Senior Fellow Michael O’Hanlon at a recent Center for 21st Century Security and Intelligence (21CSI) at Brookings event, “based on the sacrifice of men and women like those in uniform, like those on this panel, and we should want to benefit from all that investment and forge what I would describe as an enduring partnership with Afghanistan to keep limited numbers of American military forces there indefinitely.” His remarks came during a discussion with other experts to assess the current state and future of Afghanistan, six months after the end of the U.S. and NATO mission there and nine months into the administration of Ashraf Ghani-Abdullah Abdullah.  Read More

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    The 10 U.S. metro rail systems that lose the most money per passenger

    Subway

    All metro rail systems across the U.S.—which include heavy rail, such as subways and elevated trains, and light rail, which operates at street level—reported operating at a loss in 2013. These are the 10 that lose the most money per passenger.  Read More

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    These maps from Raj Chetty show that where children grow up has a major impact on their lifetime earnings

    Raj Chetty: The Geography of Upward Mobility in the United States

    "Your chances of achieving the American Dream are almost two times higher ... if you are growing up in Canada than in the United States," said Harvard's Raj Chetty at a Center on Children and Families (CCF) event held Monday. Chetty, the Bloomberg Professor of Economics and a leading scholar on opportunity and intergenerational mobility, presented his latest research on how where one grows up has a huge impact on success later in life. In his presentation, Prof. Chetty focused not on international comparisons, but on variations within the United States, where, he said, upward mobility varies even more.

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