Molly Reynolds is a fellow in Governance Studies at Brookings. She studies Congress, with an emphasis on how congressional rules and procedure affect domestic policy outcomes.

Her current research explores exceptions to the filibuster rule for particular measures in the U.S. Senate, such as the procedures for considering the yearly budget resolution, trade agreements, and plans for closing military bases. She finds that these special rules are created and used when doing so is in the current political interest of the Senate's majority party. In addition, she studies the congressional budget process, including the use and consequences of filibuster-proof budget reconciliation bills. Other projects also include work on the role of issue advertising in legislative politics, especially health policy, and on how individual senators use obstructive tactics to gain political benefits from the legislative process.

Reynolds received her Ph.D. in political science and public policy from the University of Michigan and her A.B. in government from Smith College, and previously served as a senior research coordinator in the Governance Studies program at Brookings. In addition, she has served as an instructor at George Mason University.

Molly Reynolds is a fellow in Governance Studies at Brookings. She studies Congress, with an emphasis on how congressional rules and procedure affect domestic policy outcomes.

Her current research explores exceptions to the filibuster rule for particular measures in the U.S. Senate, such as the procedures for considering the yearly budget resolution, trade agreements, and plans for closing military bases. She finds that these special rules are created and used when doing so is in the current political interest of the Senate’s majority party. In addition, she studies the congressional budget process, including the use and consequences of filibuster-proof budget reconciliation bills. Other projects also include work on the role of issue advertising in legislative politics, especially health policy, and on how individual senators use obstructive tactics to gain political benefits from the legislative process.

Reynolds received her Ph.D. in political science and public policy from the University of Michigan and her A.B. in government from Smith College, and previously served as a senior research coordinator in the Governance Studies program at Brookings. In addition, she has served as an instructor at George Mason University.