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Past Event

Health and Morbidity in India: Evidence and Policy Implications

Past Event

Key findings

The decade from 2004 to 2014 saw the Indian economy grow at an impressive rate. This was also the time when the government brought sweeping policy initiatives into the healthcare sector. New health schemes were introduced at the national level as well as state levels. After a decade of experimentation, India is still faced with national and international criticism for its low investments in healthcare and for overall poor health outcomes. This study aims to systematically analyse health and morbidity in India during this time period.

In particular, we analyse changes in health-seeking behaviour of Indian households, changes in their out-of-pocket health expenditures and changes in their major sources of healthcare financing, over time. We are able to map some of the major healthcare initiatives of the government to these changes in outcomes of health-seeking, out-of-pocket expenditure and health financing.

Event Announcement

Brookings India launched its latest research paper “Health and Morbidity in India: 2004-2014″ followed by a panel discussion on “Health and Morbidity in India: Evidence and Policy Implications”, on Friday 2nd of December at 3:00pm, at the auditorium of the Library Building, Teen Murti House, New Delhi.

The Agenda was as follows:
3:00pm: Welcome remarks Mr. Shakti Sinha (Director NMML)

3:05 – 3:30pm: Study Presentation Dr. Shamika Ravi (Senior Fellow Brookings India)

3:30 – 4:25pm: moderated panel discussion

The panellists:

Lalitha Kumaramangalam (Chairperson, National Commission for Women)

TCA Anant, (Secretary MoSPI, Government of India)

Poonam Khetrapal (Regional Director, WHO)

K Srinath Reddy (President, Public Health Foundation of India)

4:25pm: Closing remarks Dr. Harsha Vardhana Singh (Executive Director Brookings India)

4:30pm: Tea/Coffee and snacks

About the Paper: “Health And Morbidity in India: 2004-2014”

The decade from 2004 to 2014 was a time when the country brought in sweeping policy initiatives into its healthcare sector. A Brookings India study systematically analyses health and morbidity in India during this time period. The NSSO data used in the study make it possible for us to compare healthcare in India over the 10 years. In particular, we analyse changes in health-seeking behaviour of Indian households, changes in their out-of-pocket health expenditures and changes in their major sources of healthcare financing, over time. We are able to map some of the major healthcare initiatives of the government to these changes in outcomes of health seeking, out-of-pocket expenditure and health financing.

Read the Executive Summary

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