• FixGov

    4/20 series: Medical cannabis in Connecticut driven by science and medicine

    As of 4/20/2015, 23 states have a regulated medical marijuana system, four states have legalized recreational use, and many more states are poised to take up the issue in 2016. In this FixGov series, scholars will review the political, regulatory, and legal landscape surrounding cannabis in America. In this post, John Hudak looks at the regulatory system for medical marijuana in Connecticut. 

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    Why America's responses to the financial crisis brought us to the edge of political crisis

    U.S. Secretary of the Treasury Timothy Geithner (R) listens to Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke (L) at the Treasury Department for the meeting of the Financial Stability Oversight Council in Washington November 13, 2012.

    How should we assess America's responses to the 2008 financial crisis? In this blog post, Philip Wallach begins to provide some answers to this question. His new book, 
    "To the Edge: Legality, Legitimacy, and the Responses to the 2008 Financial Crisis," delves even deeper into the roots of widespread political distrust of the crisis responses, despite their policy successes. 

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    Welcoming Czech Finance Minister Andrej Babis

    U.S. Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew makes remarks during a news conference in Washington April 17, 2015. Lew briefed the media after two days of the IMF and World Bank's 2015 Annual Spring Meetings.

    Last Thursday Brookings saw three separate visits from European finance ministers who were in town for the IMF meetings. In this post, Norman Eisen discusses the meeting between Czech Finance Minister and Deputy Prime Minister Andrej Babis and Governance Studies scholars. 

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    4/20 series: 12 key people to watch in marijuana policy

    In the past few years, marijuana policy has emerged as a key issue in American politics. In this post, John Hudak lays out 12 people to watch in the future of marijuana policy.

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  • FixGov

    4/20 series: A deep dive into marijuana policy in the U.S.

    As of 4/20/2015, 23 states have a regulated medical marijuana system, four states have legalized recreational use, and many more states are poised to take up the issue in 2016. In this FixGov series, scholars will review the political, regulatory, and legal landscape surrounding cannabis in America. 

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    Overcoming corporate short-termism: Blackrock's chairman weighs in

    BlackRock Chairman and CEO Laurence Fink speaks at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York, February 29, 2012. Fink, who heads the $3.51 trillion asset management firm BlackRock, was speaking at the Council on Foreign Relations and discussing a series of objectives with chief executive officers.

    In a letter yesterday to the Fortune 500 CEOs, BlackRock Chairman Larry Fink criticized the short-term orientation that he believes shapes too much of today’s corporate behavior. In this post, William Galston and Elaine Kamarck review Fink's position and argue for changing the laws that govern investor and corporate behavior to encourage more patient capital. 

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    Changing composition of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court: New designees

    Senate Intelligence Committee Chair Senator Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) (L) and Vice Chairman Senator Saxby Chambliss (R-GA) listen during the Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on the House-passed Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act reform bill while on Capitol Hill in Washington, June 5, 2014.

    Chief Justice John G. Roberts, Jr. has designated two new members of the eleven-member Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISC), which has been the object of debate of it's largely non-adversarial proceedings related to domestic government surveillance. In this post, Russell Wheeler highlights important aspects of the FISC's composition when the new designees join the court in May. 

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    Polarization, policymaking, & public service: Tom Mann reviews Barney Frank's memoir

    FixGov Government Reform Series Logo

    In this post, Tom Mann reviews Barney Frank’s Frank: A Life in Politics From the Great Society to Same-Sex Marriage. Filled with passion and lacerating wit, Mann argues that Frank's memoir also offers lessons on fixing government during an era of political polarization.

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    Can we take the politics out of the federal minimum wage?

    Thirty-year-old David Coulombe (behind banner), who works as a consumables sales floor associate at Walmart, participates in a march and rally for $15 minimum wage in Boston, Massachusetts April 14, 2015. Walmart has announced that it will institute a nationwide $9 per hour minimum wage, but Coulombe, who started working at Walmart as a cart pusher, already makes $11.70 per hour and lives with his parents because he cannot afford to live on his own. Coulombe took part in a protest outside Walmart headquarters two years ago and says he was "coached," a company term for discipline, for taking part.

    1. A Federal Minimum Wage Advisory Board. This could be made up (like the U.K. version) of nine members: three representatives of employer organizations, three from labor organizations, and three independent labor economists. The Board would recommend a rate for the national minimum wage each year, which would then be enacted by Congress in the usual manner. The Board would have a strong incentive to set a rate likely to be adopted by Congress, in order to establish and maintain its reputation: there is, after all, little point in sitting on a Board that is ignored. The Board’s recommendation would not be binding and would not become the legal ‘default’ level. But because the advice is likely to be sensible, Congress would likely be inclined to follow it.   Read More

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    Is it time to rethink the congressional budget resolution?

    DATE IMPORTED:February 27, 2015U.S. House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) (C) walks to the House floor for procedural votes for legislation to fund the Department of Homeland Security at the Capitol in Washington, February 27, 2015. Congressional Republicans on Friday hoped to avoid a partial shutdown of the U.S. domestic security agency by finding votes to pass a three-week-long stopgap funding bill, which the White House said President Barack Obama would sign if it came to his desk

    April 15 has arrived and Congress once again has not adopted a budget resolution, but it was not for lack of trying. In this post, Kevin Kosar lays out arguments for rethinking the congressional budgeting process altogether. 

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