• FixGov

    The future of the U.S. Postal Service

    A U.S. Postal service delivery truck sits covered in snow outside the post office in Manhasset, New York January 27, 2015. U.S. Postal service spokeswoman Christine Dugas has reported service will be suspended today in Connecticut, Rhode Island, southeastern and western Massachusetts and Long Island, New York, because of the snowstorm, according to local reports.

    The U.S. Postal Service was created more than 200 years ago and may be the country’s oldest continuously operating business. Unfortunately, the service may be becoming obsolete. In this post, Elaine Kamarck looks at the challenges facing the U.S. Postal Service, and what may be in store for its future. 

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  • FixGov

    The politics of the bipartisan letter to President Obama on the Iran negotiations

    U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about Iran during his meeting with Secretary of Defense Ash Carter in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington March 3, 2015. Obama on Tuesday told reporters "as far as I can tell, there was nothing new" in Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's address to Congress panning U.S.-led nuclear talks with Iran. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

    On March 20, a bipartisan group of House members dispatched a cautionary letter to President Obama about the content of the emerging nuclear deal with Iran.  In this post, William Galston explores the politics of the signatories, and what that might mean for 2016. 

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  • FixGov

    Cabinet secretaries versus the White House staff

    REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst - A general view from the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, March 17 2015.

    Over most of U.S. history cabinet secretaries have been among the most important formal advisers to presidents, and they exercised important managerial roles in implementing government policies and programs. In this post, James Pfiffner explores the dynamics between cabinet secretaries and White House staffers in the past and in the Obama administration. 

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  • FixGov

    Nevada has a duty to prep for legal pot

    Rows of Cannabis plants are seen in a state-owned agricultural farm in Rovigo, about 60 km (40 miles) from Venice, September 22, 2014. Italy legalised marijuana for medical use last year, but the high cost of buying legal pot in a pharmacy meant few people signed up. Starting next year, a high-security lab in a military compound in Florence will grow cannabis for Italy's health care system in an experiment the government says could bring safe, legal and affordable marijuana to suffering patients.

    Nevadans will vote on the legalization of marijuana in 2016. In this post, John Hudak argues this is a historic public policy decision that Nevada has an opportunity to prepare administratively for recreational marijuana. 

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  • FixGov

    Fusion Centers: What's working and what isn't

    U.S. Department of Homeland Security employees work during a guided media tour inside the National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center in Arlington, Virginia June 26, 2014. Picture taken June 26, 2014.

    There has been contentious debate in homeland security circles over the past several years has over fusion centers—state and local run organizations dedicated to information sharing and analysis. In this post, Jason Barnosky looks at the benefits and drawbacks of the rise of fusion centers since 9/11.

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  • FixGov

    The landmark LGBT-Mormon compromise in Utah

    Utah state Senators Stephen Urquhart (L) and Jim Dabakis hold a press conference at the state capitol in Salt Lake City, Utah January 27, 2015. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints announced it supports the passage of laws protecting the LGBT community from discrimination, as long as they also protect religious freedom.

    The landmark Mormon-gay compromise that overwhelmingly passed deep-red Utah’s legislature last week isn’t a template for other states,  but it may suggest a pathway to conversations in other states. In this post, Jonathan Rauch shares his takeaways from yesterday's panel discussion at Brookings, “Gays, Mormons, and the Constitution: Are there win-win answers for LGBT rights and religious conscience?” 

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  • FixGov

    The debt ceiling, yet again

    U.S. Treasury Secretary Jack Lew testifies before the Senate Finance Committee on the U.S. government debt limit in Washington October 10, 2013. Lew said on Thursday that gridlock in Washington was hurting the U.S. economy and urged Congress to raise a cap on government borrowing to keep America from defaulting on its debt. The U.S. government shutdown is now in day 10.

    On Monday, March 16, the US runs yet again into the debt ceiling. In this post, Philip Wallach argues that, while not necessarily a catastrophe, the debt ceiling is simply a terrible distraction from the important business of thinking about our nation’s fiscal future.

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  • FixGov

    Household income growth under four American presidents

    U.S. President Barack Obama (C) is joined by former U.S. Presidents George W. Bush (L) and Bill Clinton (R) in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington while speaking about disaster aid to Haiti, January 16, 2010.

    The conventional wisdom about the American economy is that, in spite of the recovery, middle-class Americans are still hurting. A new Brookings paper from the economist Rob Shapiro upends the conventional wisdom, offering a more accurate look into what’s been happening to Americans and their pocketbooks. In this post, Elaine Kamarck highlights salient points from the paper. 


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  • FixGov

    The Mormon-LGBT civil-rights deal breaks new ground in Utah

    REUTERS/Jim Urquhart - Members of the Mormon church march in a gay pride parade in Salt Lake City, Utah, June 2, 2013. Both Mormons and members of the Boy Scouts marched with members of LGBT community and their supporters as part of the Utah Pride Festival.

    In Utah, Wednesday brought the remarkable sight of gay-rights leaders and Mormon church leaders standing together to endorse a new proposed anti-discrimination law. In this post, Jonathan Rauch discusses the importance of this proposal and its national implications  Read More

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  • FixGov

    Americans’ views increasingly hawkish on terrorism, ISIS

    DATE IMPORTED:November 24, 2014Iraqi Shi'ite fighters pose with an Islamic State flag which they pulled down on the front line in Jalawla, Diyala province, November 23, 2014. Iraqi forces said on Sunday they retook two towns north of Baghdad from Islamic State fighters, driving them from strongholds they had held for months and clearing a main road from the capital to Iran. Picture taken November 23, 2014.

    The latest Quinnipiac survey shows support by a 2-to-1 margin for sending American troops to fight ISIS. In this post, William Galston discusses the impact of these poll results. 

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