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  • Brookings Now

    5 Myths You Shouldn't Believe about Government Transparency

    A lone worker passes by the U.S. Capitol building in Washington, October 8, 2013. A few faint glimmers of hope surfaced in the U.S. fiscal standoff, both in Congress and at the White House, with President Barack Obama saying he would accept a short-term increase in the nation's borrowing authority to avoid a default.

    In a new Center for Effective Public Management paper, Gary Bass—executive director of the Bauman Foundation; Danielle Brian—executive director of the Project on Government Oversight; and Brookings Visiting Fellow Norman Eisen argue that "more transparency is needed, not less," to solve Washington's problems. They respond to transparency critics' five principle myths.  Read More

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  • Education Plus Development

    Teyise Dlamini Tells the United Nations, Children are the Future

    Maysa Jalbout recounts 15-year-old Teyise Dlamini's speech to the United Nations, and reflects on why Dlamini is such a powerful example of children being the future.

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  • The Avenue

    Obama’s Overshadowed Start-up Gambit

    U.S. President Barack Obama talks about immigration reform while at the Copernicus Community Center in Chicago November 25, 2014.

    Overshadowed by the provisions for children and parents in President Obama's executive order on immigration are new rules on another hot-button topic: foreign technology entrepreneurs.  Read More

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  • PlanetPolicy

    India’s Role in the International Climate Negotiations

    A view of the opening ceremony of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in Doha (REUTERS/Mohammed Dabbous).

    Scott Moore discusses the crucial role India will play in the upcoming UNFCCC meetings.  Read More

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  • Up Front

    Part 1: Online Campaigning: Big and Evolving

    REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz - A woman exits a McDonald's restaurant while members of 'MoveOn' shout slogans against the company in front of the restaurant in Times Square, New York, December 4, 2013.

    More than 100 million people are engaged in online campaigns, with thousands of ‘wins’ attributed to them. Fergus Hanson puts to the question: after a decade and a half of digital democracy, where do things stand? This three-part blog series begins with a look at online activist sites like Change.org.  Read More

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  • Africa in Focus

    Congressman William Frenzel: A Mountain of Humility

    Bill Frenzel speaking at an event on deficit reduction at the Brookings Institution.

    Mwangi Kimenyi reflects on the accomplishments of and his personal friendship with the late Congressman Bill Frenzel.

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  • Brookings Now

    The Thanksgiving Letter Robert Brookings Got from His Mom in 1864

    Thomas Nast, Thanksgiving Day, 1864, Harper's Weekly

    On November 27, 1864, in the midst of the Civil War and just weeks after Maryland adopted a new constitution outlawing slavery in the state, Mary Reynolds wrote a loving, Thanksgiving-themed letter to her son, Robert S. Brookings, the future founder of the Brookings Institution. He was then a 14-year-old student attending the West Nottingham Academy near Rising Sun, Maryland. Her letter, datelined Perrymansville (now Perryman), a town about 20 miles away from the boarding school, opens with a question: “How did you spend your Thanksgiving or did you know last Thursday was Thanksgiving day [?]” Read and download the full text of the letter here.  Read More

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  • Iran at Brookings

    Iran Nuclear Talks: For Europe, Roll-Over Is Better than Game Over

    Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif and EU envoy Catherine Ashton address a news conference after a meeting in Vienna (REUTERS/Leonhard Foeger).

    Riccardo Alcaro argues that while Europe does not want a nuclear deal with Iran at any cost, the Europeans are the most determined of all the parties involved with the talks to seek a negotiated resolution. The decision earlier this week to extend the terms of the interim nuclear accord with Iran is the second-best option for the international community and particularly for Europe.

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  • Iran at Brookings

    After the Elections: Tunisia’s Political Future

    Tunisians cast their votes at a polling station during Tunisia's presidential election in Sousse (REUTERS/Anis Mili).

    Tunisian elections produced losses for the Islamist Ennahda party in parliament and a likely run-off between secular party candidate Beji Caid Essebsi and Moncef Marzouki, the interim president. Brookings convened a roundtable of experts to discuss the country’s political future and ways the United States could help consolidate Tunisia’s political, economic, and security stability.

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  • TechTank

    Three Lessons from the History of Digital Television for Broadband Policy Development

    Men look at Sony Corp's television at the company headquarters in Tokyo May 22, 2013. Sony Corp cut its sales targets for digital cameras, smartphones and tablets by 13-17 percent for the year to end-March 2015, but said there were "encouraging" signs of a revival in its electronics business.

    Recent work from the scholars who study Internet speeds find the United States has fallen behind in its broadband development. The horse-race nature of this narrative is reminiscent of a similar history that played out on the world stage a few decades ago. Retracing the chronology of digital television’s development can illustrate that organizing tomorrow’s policies around today’s technologies may be extremely difficult and unwise for the public interest.

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