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  • Brookings Now

    Brookings Today, 10/20/14

    Brookings Today

    A roundup of some of the content published today by Brookings.  Read More

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  • Up Front

    Building Bridges: Health Care, Meet Population Health

    There’s been considerable discussion recently about building a “Culture of Health” in communities across the nation. This is now a core strategic focus of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and it’s aligned with many pilot projects and other efforts in the public and private sectors to improve nutrition and exercise opportunities, early childhood programs, social supports, and the other big influences on population health. One of the most promising yet most challenging fronts in these efforts is bridging the gap between good “health” and good “health care.”   Read More

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  • FixGov

    2014 Midterms: Why the Election Will Matter... and Why It Won't

    2014 midterm elections

    With the 2014 midterm elections just over two weeks away, attention is focused on how individual races will shape control of Congress over the next two years. In this post in the 2014 Midterm Elections Series, Tom Mann looks at the limited impact the midterm elections will have on presidential-congressional relations. 

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  • FixGov

    The 2014 Midterm Elections Series

    2014 midterm elections

    With the 2014 midterm elections just over two weeks away, attention is focused on how individual races will shape control of Congress over the next two years. In a follow up to our 2014 Primaries Project, FixGov blog is starting a two week 2014 Midterm Elections series.

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  • Social Mobility Memos

    Part 3: Changing the Default to Improve Families’ Opportunity

    April Metts plays with her two-year old son Jamar at her apartment in Providence, Rhode Island (REUTERS/Brian Snyder).

    With 60% of all births to young, single women being unplanned, Isabel Sawhill asks why are so many women having trouble aligning their fertility behavior with their intentions?  Read More

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  • FixGov

    Protecting the Public

    Honoree and human rights lawyer, Thuli Madonsela arrives at the Time 100 gala celebrating the magazine's naming of the 100 most influential people in the world for the past year, in New York April 29, 2014.

    Last week, Transparency International (TI) presented its annual Integrity Award to Thuli Madonsela of South Africa, who holds the title "Public Protector." In this post, Stephen Davis looks at Madonsela's history of fighting corruption.

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  • Brookings Now

    Ten Noteworthy Moments In U.S. Investigative Journalism

    Since the late 19th century, American journalists have used their craft to call government and corporations to account for wrongdoing, secret practices, and even corruption, often sparking public outcry and reform. In the latest Brookings Essay, Robert Kaiser, former managing editor of The Washington Post, examines the digital revolution that has forever changed American journalism, and not for the better. Calling journalism “the lifeblood of a free, democratic society,” Kaiser recalls a “golden era of journalism” before declining budgets and profits cut into news reporting, including investigative journalism. Listed here (and in the Essay) are ten noteworthy moments in U.S. investigative journalism. It is neither a top ten list nor a ranking of any sort; many well-qualified media outlets have assembled their own excellent lists. It also focuses on print journalism, though many great episodes of the form have appeared on television. As well, this investigative journalism is but one facet of the vital profession that reports the news.  Read More

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  • TechTank

    The United States Must Respond to the Islamic State Threat (on Twitter)

    A member loyal to the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) waves an ISIL flag in Raqqa June 29, 2014. The offshoot of al Qaeda which has captured swathes of territory in Iraq and Syria has declared itself an Islamic "Caliphate" and called on factions worldwide to pledge their allegiance, a statement posted on jihadist websites said on Sunday. The group, previously known as the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), also known as ISIS, has renamed itself "Islamic State" and proclaimed its leader Abu Bakr al-Baghadi as "Caliph" - the head of the state, the statement said.

    The Twitter account ISILCats uses lolspeak or the intentional misspelling of words often describing the imagined thoughts of cats or other animals. The Islamic State’s use of new media and general understanding of the Internet culture comes as a shock to most people after they consider the group’s mission is to create a caliphate. Despite the cognitive dissonance this thought creates, the web savvy of ISIL is real and deserving of a strong response.

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  • Brookings Now

    Weekend Reads: A New Way to Pay for College, Oil Prices in Free Fall, and More

    Brookings Weekend Reads

    A selection of new content from Brookings this week, plus what our experts are reading.  Read More

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  • PlanetPolicy

    World Oil Demand: And Then There Was None

    As global oil prices continue to fall, many analysts have asked why there has been such a drastic drop in demand and what the long-term consequences will be on the world energy market. Charles Ebinger looks at the reasons for this development and what this means for crude oil prices and U.S. oil and gas production.  Read More

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