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  • TechTank

    The Need for a New Agency to Regulate Robots

    Spanish actor Antonio Banderas waves alongside a robot used in the film Automata during a photocall on the third day of the 62nd San Sebastian Film Festival, September 21, 2014. Banderas stars in and produced the science fiction film, which is part of the festival's official section. REUTERS/Vincent West

    Emerging technologies often generate a great debate over the efficacy of new federal regulations. In the past, the government has had to adapt to new technologies like the railroad or the radio. Typically lawmakers work out a compromise that protects safety and the rule of law. As robotics technology has steadily advanced the conversation about government oversight has started to grow louder. In a recent paper, Ryan Calo explores the idea of a new Federal agency that explicitly deals with robots. 

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  • Brookings Now

    Brookings Today, 9/30/14

    Brookings Today

    A roundup of some of the content published today by Brookings.  Read More

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  • Up Front

    Bilateral Security Agreement: A New Era of Afghan-U.S. Cooperation

    Afghan national security adviser Hanif Atmar, U.S. Ambassador James Cunningham, Afghan President Ashraf Ghani Ahmadzai and Chief Executive Abdullah Abdullah sign the bilateral security agreement in Kabul, Afghanistan.

    Today, writes John Evans, Afghanistan’s new president, Ashraf Ghani, looked on as U.S. Ambassador James Cunningham and Afghan National Security Advisor Hanif Atmar signed a bilateral security agreement (BSA) between the two countries that will ensure a U.S./NATO troop presence in Afghanistan beyond the end of this calendar year.  Read More

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  • Social Mobility Memos

    How the War on Drugs Damages Black Social Mobility

    Jonathan Rothwell looks at drug arrest data to see how "the War on Drugs" has been fought unequally in black and white populations, resulting in longer-term negative effects for the upward social mobility of black Americans.  Read More

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  • Up Front

    The Roots of Hong Kong Protest

    Founders of the Occupy Central civil disobedience movement shave their heads in Hong Kong, China.

    Richard Bush examines the role of protest movements in China and writes that Hong Kong’s protest tradition is homegrown and a response to policies that have alienated the majority of the public for decades. Bush argues that so too, the solution to Hong Kong’s political dilemma will be found at home, by engaging the public rather than trying to shut it out.  Read More

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  • The Avenue

    Learning English and Leadership in Houston

    Buildings in downtown Houston reflect the light of a setting sun (REUTERS/Mike Blake).

    Houston is America on demographic fast-forward. In the first decade of this century, the metro area’s foreign-born population grew 48 percent, compared to 28 percent for the nation as a whole. More than 42 percent of Houston’s children have at least one foreign-born parent, compared with a national rate of 23 percent.
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  • FixGov

    Six Days After Ferguson: America's Racial Disconnect in One Chart

    Protesters call for a thorough investigation of the shooting death of teen Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, on a street in front of the White House in Washington, August 28, 2014

    On September 23, 2014, Public Religion Research Institute released the 2014 American Values Survey. When analyzing the data, CEO Robert Jones realized the survey contained a rare snapshot of the racial divide between white and non-white Americans before and after the August 9th shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri. In this post, Jones looks at how the events of Ferguson influenced survey responses.  

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  • Brookings Now

    WATCH: What if Everybody Waited Until They Were Ready to Have Children?

    Video still from "Generation Unbound: Drifting into Sex and Parenthood without Marriage," a new book by Isabel Sawhill, who discusses key data with Chanel Dority in this video.

    "Marriage used to be the standard for having children in the United States; it no longer is," says Senior Fellow Isabel Sawhill in this video about her new book, Generation Unbound: Drifting into Sex and Parenthood without Marriage. Sawhill discusses surprising facts about unintended pregnancies, childbearing and marriage with Chanel Dority, the web and social media coordinator for The Hamilton Project at Brookings.  Read More

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  • FixGov

    The Primaries Project: Understanding American Parties and Factions

    The Primaries Project

    Despite telling pollsters that they vote for "the person, not the party," most Americans vote for their party with a remarkable degree of consistency. In this post, Elaine Kamarck uses data from The Primaries Project to look at factions within each political party—the Tea Party on one hand and Progressive Democrats on the other—to see how internal challenges within the parties play out in elections. 

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  • TechTank

    Are Rock Star CIOs the Secret to Public Innovation?

    Picture of Vivek Kundra

    A new mandate has just landed on the desk of state Chief Information Officers (CIOs): innovate or else. But, not all CIOs are able to live up to this lofty standard. New research investigates, which CIOs are the best innovators.

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