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Past Event

Fast track to recovery: US-China collaboration on COVID-19 prevention and treatment

Past Event

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, spawning new variants around the world, few issues are more pressing than controlling its spread. There is an urgent need for the world’s two largest economies — which have come together on virtually every global health crisis of the 21st century — to join forces again to stop the pandemic. With addressing COVID-19 a top priority for leaders in both Washington and Beijing, it is a critical time for collaboration.

On Monday, March 1, the Brookings Institution and Tsinghua University provided a forum for leading public health and medical experts in both countries to explore the way forward with concrete policy recommendations for medical and research cooperation, vaccine development and distribution, and international protocols for global travel and trade.

Viewers submitted questions via email to events@brookings.edu or join the conversation on Twitter using #USChina.

Agenda

Opening remarks

Qiu Yong

President - Tsinghua University

Keynote conversation

Panelist

Dr. George F. Gao

Director-General - Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention

Panelist

Dr. Ian Lipkin

Director - Center for Infection and Immunity, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University

Expert panel

Panelist

Dr. Thomas Frieden

President and CEO - Resolve to Save Lives

Former Director - U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Panelist

Dr. Jane Henney

Lead Director - AmerisourceBergen Corporation

Former Commissioner - U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)

Panelist

Dr. Wu Zunyou

Chief Epidemiologist - Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention

Panelist

Dr. Zhang Wenhong

Director of the Department of Infectious Disease - Huashan Hospital, Fudan University

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