Vanda Felbab-Brown is a senior fellow in the Center for 21st Century Security and Intelligence in the Foreign Policy program at Brookings. She is an expert on international and internal conflicts and nontraditional security threats, including insurgency, organized crime, urban violence and illicit economies. Her fieldwork and research have covered, among others, Afghanistan, South Asia, Burma, Indonesia, the Andean region, Mexico, Morocco, Somalia, and eastern Africa.

Felbab-Brown is the author of “Aspiration and Ambivalence: Strategies and Realities of Counterinsurgency and State-Building in Afghanistan” (Brookings Institution Press, 2012) and “Shooting Up: Counterinsurgency and the War on Drugs” (Brookings Institution Press, 2010) which examines military conflict and illegal economies in Colombia, Peru, Afghanistan, Burma, Northern Ireland, India, and Turkey. She is also the author of numerous policy reports, academic articles, and opinion pieces. A frequent commentator in U.S. and international media, Felbab-Brown regularly provides congressional testimony on these issues.

Among her recent publications are: "No Easy Exit: Drugs and Counternarcotics Policies in Afghanistan" (forthcoming); "Beyond Counterterrorism: Enhancing the Effectiveness of Measures to Combat Wildlife Trafficking" (forthcoming); "US-Mexico Summit: From Empathy to Security Cooperation Specifics" (Brookings, 2015); "Changing the Game or Dropping the Ball? Peña Nieto’s Security Policy and Organized Crime in Mexico" (Brookings, 2014); "Small Steps to Save Our Gains in Afghanistan" (The Washington Post, 2014) (co-authored); "Security Considerations for Conducting Fieldwork in Highly Dangerous Places or on Highly Dangerous Topics" (Social Science Research Council, 2014); "Improving Supply Side Policies: Smarter Eradication, Interdiction, and Alternative Livelihoods and the Possibility of Licensing" (London School of Economics, 2014); "Security and Political Developments in Afghanistan in 2014 and Beyond: Endgame or New Game?" (Vienna: Government of Austria, 2014); "Obama’s State of the Union Speech and the Seductiveness of Limited Intervention" (Brookings, 2014); "The Not-so-Jolly Roger: Dealing with Piracy off The Coast of Somalia and in the Gulf of Guinea?" (Brookings, 2014); "The Purpose of Law Enforcement Is to Make Good Criminals? How to Effectively Respond to the Crime-Terrorism Nexus" (Potomac Institute of Policy Studies, 2013); "Despite Its Siren Song, High-Value Targeting Doesn’t Fit All: Matching Interdiction Patterns to Specific Narcoterrorism and Organized-Crime Contexts" (Brookings, 2013); "Afghanistan After ISAF" (Harvard International Review, 2013); "A State-Building Approach to the Drug Trade Problem" (UN Chronicle, 2013); "The Political Games in the Taliban Negotiations" (Brookings, 2013); "Crime-War Battlefields" (Survival, May 2013); "The Orangutan’s Road: Illegal Logging and Mining in Indonesia" (Brookings, 2013); "Crime as Mirror of Politics: Urban Gangs in Indonesia" (Brookings, 2013); "Peña Nieto’s Piñata: The Promise and Pitfalls of Mexico’s New Security Policy against Organized Crime" (Brookings, 2013); "Political Violence and the Illicit Economies of West Africa" (Terrorism and Political Violence, 2012); "Bringing the State to the Slum: Confronting Organized Crime and Urban Violence in Latin America" (Brookings 2011); "Not as Easy as Falling off a Log: The Illegal Timber Trade in the Asia-Pacific Region and Possible Mitigation Strategies" (Brookings, 2011); "The Disappearing Act: The Illicit Trade in Wildlife in Asia" (Brookings, 2011); and "The Political Economy of Illegal Domains in India and China" (International Lawyer, Winter 2009).

Felbab-Brown received her doctorate in political science from MIT and her bachelor’s from Harvard University.

Affiliations:
Council on Foreign Relations, member
Crime Law Enforcement, member, advisory board
Global Initiative Against Organized Crime, network member
New York University Center for International Cooperation, U.S.-China Dialogue on Afghanistan and Pakistan, member
Taliban Resources Project, member, advisory board

Vanda Felbab-Brown is a senior fellow in the Center for 21st Century Security and Intelligence in the Foreign Policy program at Brookings. She is an expert on international and internal conflicts and nontraditional security threats, including insurgency, organized crime, urban violence and illicit economies. Her fieldwork and research have covered, among others, Afghanistan, South Asia, Burma, Indonesia, the Andean region, Mexico, Morocco, Somalia, and eastern Africa.

Felbab-Brown is the author of “Aspiration and Ambivalence: Strategies and Realities of Counterinsurgency and State-Building in Afghanistan” (Brookings Institution Press, 2012) and “Shooting Up: Counterinsurgency and the War on Drugs” (Brookings Institution Press, 2010) which examines military conflict and illegal economies in Colombia, Peru, Afghanistan, Burma, Northern Ireland, India, and Turkey. She is also the author of numerous policy reports, academic articles, and opinion pieces. A frequent commentator in U.S. and international media, Felbab-Brown regularly provides congressional testimony on these issues.

Among her recent publications are: “No Easy Exit: Drugs and Counternarcotics Policies in Afghanistan” (forthcoming); “Beyond Counterterrorism: Enhancing the Effectiveness of Measures to Combat Wildlife Trafficking” (forthcoming); “US-Mexico Summit: From Empathy to Security Cooperation Specifics” (Brookings, 2015); “Changing the Game or Dropping the Ball? Peña Nieto’s Security Policy and Organized Crime in Mexico” (Brookings, 2014); “Small Steps to Save Our Gains in Afghanistan” (The Washington Post, 2014) (co-authored); “Security Considerations for Conducting Fieldwork in Highly Dangerous Places or on Highly Dangerous Topics” (Social Science Research Council, 2014); “Improving Supply Side Policies: Smarter Eradication, Interdiction, and Alternative Livelihoods and the Possibility of Licensing” (London School of Economics, 2014); “Security and Political Developments in Afghanistan in 2014 and Beyond: Endgame or New Game?” (Vienna: Government of Austria, 2014); “Obama’s State of the Union Speech and the Seductiveness of Limited Intervention” (Brookings, 2014); “The Not-so-Jolly Roger: Dealing with Piracy off The Coast of Somalia and in the Gulf of Guinea?” (Brookings, 2014); “The Purpose of Law Enforcement Is to Make Good Criminals? How to Effectively Respond to the Crime-Terrorism Nexus” (Potomac Institute of Policy Studies, 2013); “Despite Its Siren Song, High-Value Targeting Doesn’t Fit All: Matching Interdiction Patterns to Specific Narcoterrorism and Organized-Crime Contexts” (Brookings, 2013); “Afghanistan After ISAF” (Harvard International Review, 2013); “A State-Building Approach to the Drug Trade Problem” (UN Chronicle, 2013); “The Political Games in the Taliban Negotiations” (Brookings, 2013); “Crime-War Battlefields” (Survival, May 2013); “The Orangutan’s Road: Illegal Logging and Mining in Indonesia” (Brookings, 2013); “Crime as Mirror of Politics: Urban Gangs in Indonesia” (Brookings, 2013); “Peña Nieto’s Piñata: The Promise and Pitfalls of Mexico’s New Security Policy against Organized Crime” (Brookings, 2013); “Political Violence and the Illicit Economies of West Africa” (Terrorism and Political Violence, 2012); “Bringing the State to the Slum: Confronting Organized Crime and Urban Violence in Latin America” (Brookings 2011); “Not as Easy as Falling off a Log: The Illegal Timber Trade in the Asia-Pacific Region and Possible Mitigation Strategies” (Brookings, 2011); “The Disappearing Act: The Illicit Trade in Wildlife in Asia” (Brookings, 2011); and “The Political Economy of Illegal Domains in India and China” (International Lawyer, Winter 2009).

Felbab-Brown received her doctorate in political science from MIT and her bachelor’s from Harvard University.

Affiliations:
Council on Foreign Relations, member
Crime Law Enforcement, member, advisory board
Global Initiative Against Organized Crime, network member
New York University Center for International Cooperation, U.S.-China Dialogue on Afghanistan and Pakistan, member
Taliban Resources Project, member, advisory board

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