Visitors look north through a barbed wire fence on which South Korean flags and reunification banners are hung, on Freedom Bridge at Imjingak pavilion near the demilitarized zone separating the two Koreas. (REUTERS/Jo Yong-Hak)

Blog Post

Why Korean reunification will be more difficult than German

March 24, 2015, Fred Dews

In a recent Brookings Cafeteria podcast, Senior Fellow Kathy Moon, the SK-Korea Foundation Chair in Korea Studies, talked about a variety of issues related to North Korea and the Korean peninsula. In her response to a question about the challenges of reunification between North Korea and South Korea, she discussed the many challenges, including cultural divisions, economic concerns, and the impact reunification would have on South Korea's political system.

  • In the News

    Failure to sign the [Trans-Pacific Partnership] would demonstrate that the United States and Japan cannot move past friction to work in areas such as internationalization of financial services, protection of intellectual property and governance of the Internet economy that are central to the 21st century economy.

    March 16, 2015, Mireya Solís, Japan Times Online
  • Interview | WBEZ's Worldview

    March 10, 2015, Katharine H.S. Moon

  • Opinion | The Wall Street Journal

    March 6, 2015, David Shambaugh

  • In the News

    The North Korean regime has been very rattled by the UN Commission of Inquiry report, its findings and its recommendations that there should be accountability at the highest level of the North Korean government."

    March 4, 2015, Roberta Cohen, NK News
  • In the News

    For many of the elite and the wealthy [men in South Korea], they were able since 1953 to maintain multiple women and have regular affairs without any kind of social stigma from male society, and for the most part women of the older generation kind of just took it as part of their fate.

    March 2, 2015, Katharine H.S. Moon, The Atlantic
  • In the News

    Domestic violence is a massive and mostly overlooked problem [in South Korea], and immigrant women have recently been arriving in the country as brides, mainly to be used as child producers. These women have very little access to [the] Korean language, they come from relatively poor backgrounds ... their husbands sometimes divorce them without the women even knowing what’s going on.

    March 2, 2015, Katharine H.S. Moon, The Atlantic
  • In the News

    You had so many women and men who had lost families ... tens of thousands that had fled from the northern part [of Korea], who had left their families behind ... or lost them in the frenzy and chaos of the refugee flow [after the Korean War]. In that sense, [the adultery law] was an attempt to create order and stability, and, especially for those marrying for the first time, to set a certain standard.

    March 2, 2015, Katharine H.S. Moon, The Atlantic
  • In the News

    It is possible for the [Chinese] yuan to become one of the dominant currencies in East Asia, but not a globally convertible dominant currency because of its hybrid model of renminbi internationalization and limited use in the global market.

    February 27, 2015, Injoo Sohn, China Daily

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