(REUTERS/Edgar Su) - Myanmar supporters unfurl their national flag before their semi-final soccer match against Vietnam in the Southeast Asian (SEA) Games at the national stadium in Singapore June 13, 2015.

Blog Post

Myanmar/Burma 101

April 13, 2016, Fred Dews

In a new episode of the Brookings Cafeteria Podcast, Nonresident Senior Fellow Lex Rieffel discusses Myanmar's remarkable transition to democracy and the leadership role of Aung San Suu Kyi. Here are some key facts about Myanmar.

  • In the News

    Whatever the personal sympathies or biases of individual members of the government, the government as a whole understands that Myanmar’s development is contingent upon stability, which in turn cannot be achieved with the blight of religious violence hanging over the country.

    July 15, 2016, Lynn Kuok, Christian Science Monitor
  • In the News

    Progress will take time—in the case of fostering appreciation between groups, possibly decades. Yet, if you look at the tremendous strides Myanmar has made just in the last five years or so, including ushering in the first democratically elected government since 1962, it shows the country is serious about change.

    July 15, 2016, Lynn Kuok, Christian Science Monitor
  • Podcast

    Burma/Myanmar and Aung San Suu Kyi

    April 8, 2016, Lex Rieffel and Fred Dews

  • Interview | BBC

    March 24, 2016, Lex Rieffel

  • In the News

    [Myanmar] needs to move quickly to deliver material improvements to people’s lives. Otherwise they stumble; people begin to lose faith.

    November 28, 2015, Terra Lawson-Remer, The Economist
  • In the News

    The policy of engagement [with Myanmar] that the Obama administration adopted was helpful. It did more good than harm as opposed to the sanctions policy. (But) let's not attribute the changes in that country to U.S. policy.

    November 6, 2015, Lex Rieffel, CNN
  • Interview | 938LIVE Singapore

    November 4, 2015, Lynn Kuok

  • In the News

    What the armed forces appear to be against is a democracy that runs counter to what it perceives as the country's national interests [in Myanmar]. Preserving the armed forces' continued influence in Parliament would be one such interest.

    August 21, 2015, Lynn Kuok, The Straits Times
  • In the News

    Students [protesting in Myanmar] object to the National Education Law vesting too much control over education in the central government's hands through the creation of a government-controlled National Education Commission and Higher Education Cooperation Committee, which have wide-ranging powers.

    March 11, 2015, Lynn Kuok, Deutsche Welle (Germany)
  • In the News

    The issue of education and educational reform is a particularly thorny one given Myanmar’s history. Students have been responsible for leading many of the country’s main protests, such as in 1988, 1996 and 1998. Students were also involved in the monk-led Saffron Revolution of 2007. For 10 out of the 12 years between 1988 and 2000, Yangon’s universities were closed.

    March 11, 2015, Lynn Kuok, Deutsche Welle (Germany)

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