Reuters/Kai Pfaffenbach - Hesse's Minister for Social Affairs and Integration Stefan Gruttner (C), talks to children of asylum seekers at the kindergarden of former U.S. army housing barracks used as a refugee registration center for the German state of Hesse in Giessen, 40km southwest of Frankfurt, Germany, September 10, 2015.

Blog Post

The refugee crisis: Sugar in a teacup?

April 27, 2016, Jishnu Das

Looking at previous examples of an influx of migrants, Jishnu Das demonstrates how integrating refugees into a society has no negative effect on wages for native laborers, and in some cases, even raises them.

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  • In the News

    At the same time, the country’s citizens were growing visibly resentful of the presence of the U.S. military in the country. It had to do with complaints about U.S. troops and their conduct off-base where Koreans live. During that time, even in Seoul, there were signs, that said, 'Americans not welcome.' So there was this very outward demonstration of this political discontent. I think for restaurants to put up signs that say, ‘No foreigners,' etcetera, there is a precedent for that from these other time periods.

    March 11, 2016, Katharine H.S. Moon, CityLab
  • In the News

    [Following a bailout from the International Monetary Fund during the Asian Financial Crisis in 1997, South Koreans] took it personally that the foreign West was intent on basically putting down this country that had become an economic miracle in such a short period of time.

    March 11, 2016, Katharine H.S. Moon, CityLab
  • In the News

    Between expats, migrant workers, military personnel, and foreign brides, 1.5 million people—or 3 percent of Korea’s population—are foreign-born. That’s expected to grow to 10 percent by 2030, which is on par with European societies today. This is a huge social change for a society that has been homogeneous in so many ways for hundreds and hundreds of years. [Koreans are taught that they come from a] thousand years of ‘pure’ ancestral bloodlines, common language, customs, and history.

    March 11, 2016, Katharine H.S. Moon, CityLab

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