Metro Monitor - April 2014

About the Metro Monitor

The Metro Monitor tracks the performance of the 100 largest U.S. metropolitan areas on four indicators: jobs, unemployment, output (gross product), and house prices. The analysis of these indicators is focused on change during three time periods: the recession, the recovery, and the combination of the two (recession + recovery). The determination of each time period is place- and indicator-specific, with the recession for a given indicator being defined by the period from its metro-specific "peak" to its "trough" and the recovery being defined by the period from its "trough" to the most recent quarter of available data.

For each time period and indicator, we present rankings out of the 100 largest U.S. metro areas (1 indicates the best performance, 100 the worst). In addition, we present an “overall” ranking that reflects metro area performance across the four indicators. For more information, see "About the data" above.

Overall Rankings of the Nation's 100 Largest Metro Areas

Industrial Specialization and Job Changes

Notes: A location quotient is defined as the metro area share of total jobs in a given industry divided by the comparable share nationwide; values greater than one demonstrate a greater than national average share of jobs in that industry, indicating specialization. Calculations of change during the recession and recovery reflect the same time period of the total jobs recession and recovery (dates available above).

Total Job Change in the Nation's 100 Largest Metro Areas

Unemployment Change in the Nation's 100 Largest Metro Areas

Output Change in the Nation's 100 Largest Metro Areas

House Price Change in the Nation's 100 Largest Metro Areas

About the Metro Monitor

The Metro Monitor tracks the performance of the 100 largest U.S. metropolitan areas on four indicators: jobs, unemployment, output (gross product), and house prices. The analysis of these indicators is focused on change during three time periods: the recession, the recovery, and the combination of the two (recession + recovery). The determination of each time period is place- and indicator-specific, with the recession for a given indicator being defined by the period from its metro-specific "peak" to its "trough" and the recovery being defined by the period from its "trough" to the the fourth quarter of 2013.