Coping with Methuselah

The Impact of Molecular Biology on Medicine and Society

Many medical authorities predict that average life expectancy could well exceed 100 years by mid century and rise even higher soon thereafter. This astonishing prospect, brought on by the revolution in molecular biology and information technology, confronts policymakers and public health officials with a host of new questions. How will increased longevity affect local and global demographic trends, government taxation and spending, health care, the workplace, Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid? What ethical and quality-of-life issues are raised by these new breakthroughs?

In Coping with Methuselah, a group of practicing scientists and public policy experts come together to address the problems, challenges, and opportunities posed by a longer life span. This book will generate discussion in political, social, and medical circles and help prepare us for the extraordinary possibilities that the future may hold.

Contributors include John T. Potts, M.D. (Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard University), William B. Schwartz, M.D. (University of Southern California), Henry J. Aaron (Brookings), Benjamin Harris (Brookings), John B. Shoven (Stanford University), Gary Burtless (Brookings), Alan M. Garber, M.D. (Stanford University), Dana Goldman (RAND), Alexander Capron (University of Southern California), Barry Bosworth (Brookings), Benjamin Keys (Brookings).