Mwangi S. Kimenyi is senior fellow in the Africa Growth Initiative and currently serves as advisory board member of the School of Economics, University of Nairobi. The founding executive director of the Kenya Institute for Public Policy Research and Analysis (1999-2005), he focuses on Africa's development including institutions for economic growth, political economy, and private sector development. | View Full Bio

  • In the News

    I think it’s good to take note that the Africans have realized that a country approach to development is okay, but given the type of market, they are not going to go very far just focusing on their own country’s approach.

    August 27, 2014, Mwangi S. Kimenyi, AFK Insider
  • In the News

    Donors and governments have broadened access to school at the cost of creating a dysfunctional public-education system where millions of children are attending school but are not learning.

    February 25, 2014, Mwangi S. Kimenyi, The Economist
  • In the News

    Kenyans do feel demoralized. They are paying a very high price for being good hosts. But, they have also recovered; they have dealt with a lot of these types of incidents, but this also brings them together.

    September 24, 2013, Mwangi S. Kimenyi, The Takeaway
  • In the News

    South Africa has been good to [Zimbabwean President Robert] Mugabe because he was good to them in the darkest years of that country’s long freedom movement. I don’t think they would ever call for diaspora voting rights because they know it would work against Mugabe and he would see it as direct opposition.

    July 31, 2013, Mwangi S. Kimenyi, Christian Science Monitor
  • In the News

    For a president who has been really absent in Africa, this was a good thing. It was a good start. It was a good signal.

    July 2, 2013, Mwangi S. Kimenyi, PBS Newshour
  • In the News

    On the policy side, Africans have been largely disappointed, especially when they look at the focus on Africa by the previous presidents. Africans have a feeling that President Obama is still not in tune with the emerging continent.

    June 25, 2013, Mwangi S. Kimenyi, Wall Street Journal
  • In the News

    Africans still consider Clinton their president. If you go to Africa and mention Clinton, he is a hero, even today. I don’t think President Obama is going to approach the level of President Clinton at all, in terms of respect, in terms of what they feel.

    June 25, 2013, Mwangi S. Kimenyi, Washington Post
  • In the News

    Africans have been wondering what happened to their son...They have seen the Chinese leaders on their continent so frequently now, that they know more about Beijing than Washington.

    June 21, 2013, Mwangi S. Kimenyi, AFP
  • In the News

    [Kenya's] economy has changed a lot, but we still have a traditional sector that has not changed a lot and that traditional sector is where, I think, [President Uhuru Kenyatta] and his deputy are going to concentrate.

    April 10, 2013, Mwangi S. Kimenyi, Al Jazeera English

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