Up Front

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    The Hutchins Center Explains: Productivity slowdown

    The Hutchins Center explains

    The Hutchins Center asks three experts why productivity – output per hour of work – is growing so slowly, finding that it could reflect fallout of the Great Recession, a dearth of new investment or inadequacies of U.S. education and training.  Read More

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    The Hutchins Center Explains: Budget Resolutions

    Louise Sheiner and Brendan Mochoruk explain budget resolutions, non-binding Congressional outlines for federal spending, and the budget reconciliation and resolution process.

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    Hutchins Roundup: Mortgage Rates, Macroprudential Policies, and More

    The Hutchins Roundup

    This week's Hutchins Roundup finds standardized mortgage rates offered by Fannie and Freddie provide a substantial regional redistribution, macroprudential policies reduce the growth rate of credit and more.  Read More

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    Sendai Framework: An important step forward for people displaced by disasters

    United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon delivers a speech during an opening ceremony of the third United Nations World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction (WCDRR) in Sendai, northern Japan (REUTERS/Kyodo).

    While the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction falls short of expectations in several regards, it is a step forward for more effectively tackling the multiple challenges of disaster-related displacement, says Walter Kälin after attending the negotiations. 

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    Hutchins Roundup: Medicare Part D, Household Formation, and More

    The Hutchins Roundup

    This week's Hutchins Roundup finds Medicare Part D premiums higher as a result of inattentive enrollees, stimulus money going to school districts has little impact on district employment, and more.  Read More

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    Hutchins Roundup: Dividend Tax Cuts, Household Spending, and More

    The Hutchins Roundup

    This week's Hutchins Roundup finds the 2003 dividend tax cut did not increase corporate investment or employee compensation, that rising unemployment and a drop in wealth reduced household spending during the Great Recession, and more.

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    China recognizes the “new normal” of slower growth

    The big news at China’s National People's Congress was that the government set the 2015 growth target at 7 percent, down from 2014’s outcome of 7.4 percent. It also modestly reduced targets for the growth of trade (6 percent versus last year’s target of 7.5) and of fixed asset investment (15 percent versus last year’s 15.7). David Dollar writes that all of this is a sensible recognition that investment is slowing in the face of excess capacity in many sectors, that the external environment remains soft, and that the slowdown in investment and trade inevitably affects gross domestic product growth.  Read More

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    The Hamilton Project's jobs gap analysis: A historical perspective

    jobs gap

    As of the end of February 2015, our nation faces a jobs gap of 4.0 million jobs. In this economic analysis, The Hamilton Project explores the recent growth of jobs in the U.S. economy, and takes an historic look at past recessions and growth between 1981 and 2007.
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    Robust job gains despite lackluster hiring by governments

    Pari Sastry and Louise Sheiner note that while labor market gains have been significant over the past year, government has not meaningfully contributed to these job gains, leading them to ask if this slow pace of government hiring constitutes a “new normal.”  Read More

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    Right-sizing the United States Navy

    U.S. Navy and Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force ships sail in formation during Annual Exercise 2011, an annual bi-lateral field-training exercise (REUTERS/U.S.Navy Photo/Handout).

    As the Navy has focused on maintaining the numbers of ships it needs, maintenance, training, and modernization budgets have declined without a commensurate reduction in operations. Robert Hein writes that the Navy currently operates 285 ships, a far cry from the 594 ships of the Reagan era, and no match for the World War II era when the Navy maintained over 6,000. While the number has declined over time, associated demand has not. 

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