Global MetroMonitor

Notes:

Metro performance rankings are based on employment and income growth rates. For the 2007–2010 period, the year of slowest growth (or largest decline) was used.

For more information, see the Global Metro Monitor home page or send an email with your questions/comments to globalmetromonitor@brookings.edu.

Follow the conversation on Twitter: #GlobalMM.

Data sources: Oxford Economics, Moody's Analytics, and the US Census Bureau.

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2010–2011

2007–2010 (min. year)

1993–2007

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Population
(millions)

Metro performance (2010–2011)

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2010–2011 Income Emp.
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2007–2010 (min. year)
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1993–2007
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Overall rankings

Combined performance on annual employment and income growth relative to other metropolitan areas

Income growth

Inflation-adjusted gross product per person. Captures economic growth while controlling for population

Employment growth

Number of employed persons. Reflects economic growth coming in the form of new jobs

Industrial structure

Gross product by industry. Shows which industries are the most important economic drivers

Rankings

Income (1993=100)

Employment (1993=100)

Industrial structure

Data not available

 

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SUMMARY

The 2011 Global MetroMonitor identifies large metropolitan areas that led or lagged on economic growth from 2010 to 2011, the latest year of a still-volatile period for the global economy. It further explains how and why metropolitan performance shifted in 2011 versus previous years, and identifies metro areas that have fully recovered from the Great Recession, those still in recovery mode, and those that continued to lose ground last year. This interactive map contains detailed economic statics for 200 global metropolitan areas.