Vali Nasr, Former State Department Advisor on South Asia, Joins Brookings

Vali Nasr, a leading expert on the Middle East and South Asia, has joined The Brookings Institution as a senior fellow, Brookings President Strobe Talbott announced today.

Nasr, who most recently served as senior advisor to the U.S. special representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan—the late Ambassador Richard Holbrooke—joins the Foreign Policy program. He will participate in events and research projects focusing on South Asia, as well as contribute to the work of the Saban Center for Middle East Policy and the Project on U.S. Relations with the Islamic World.

“Vali’s depth of knowledge and experience on the Middle East and South Asia are outstanding,” said Talbott. “I look forward to his contributions to Brookings’s research and policy initiatives, and know he will increase public and policymaker understanding of these two dynamic regions of the world.”

Nasr serves as a professor of international politics at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. He has also served as an adjunct senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and a senior fellow at the Belfer Center of the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. Nasr is the author of The Shia Revival: How Conflicts within Islam will Shape the Future (W.W. Norton, 2006), which skillfully explains the divisions within the Muslim religion to the Western audience. He is also the author of Forces of Fortune: The Rise of a New Middle Class and How it Will Change Our World (Free Press, 2009) and Democracy in Iran: History and the Quest for Liberty (Oxford University Press, 2006).

“Dr. Nasr will be an important asset to the Brookings Foreign Policy program,” said Martin Indyk, vice president and director for Foreign Policy. “We look forward to his contributions on South Asia policy and also within our Saban Center for Middle East Policy."

Nasr received a B.A. in international relations from Tufts University and earned his master’s in international economics and Middle East studies from the university’s Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. In 1991, he earned a Ph.D. in political science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.